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Old 01-28-2016, 10:13 PM   #1
..TrainMaster..
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Converting 1976 flying Scotsman to DCC

Hey there fellow train technicians. I was wanting to know if anyone knew how to or knew a link to information on how to convert a 1976 flying scotsman from DC too DCC. Unfortunately my scotsman is not DCC ready so it does not have a removable DC plug port like most DCC ready locos would have. I also ended up getting a hornby R8249 4 function digital decoder before i discovered my train was not DCC ready. Anyone got any advice?
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Old 01-29-2016, 03:10 AM   #2
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From the age of the loco I would think it's a tender drive. Should be a fairly straightforward operation. I don't know if you've installed many decoders previously but once the motor is isolated from the frame it should be plain sailing, if indeed it needs isolating. Here is a video from you tube which may help you: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=6gXoiUkP3gE

If you could post some pictures of the drive that would help.
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Old 01-29-2016, 03:42 AM   #3
..TrainMaster..
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Hey friend. Nah the loco is driven from inside the loco itself. What do you mean by isolate the motor? This would be a first time decoder installation process for me. So I got know idea what or how to go about it
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Old 01-29-2016, 04:35 AM   #4
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I had a Hornby loco in the eighties and it was tender drive, guess yours was prior to them adopting this configuration.

By isolating the motor I mean sometimes it is wired through the chassis. If it is you need to isolate it otherwise the decoder will be spoiled, so you need to check this. Just look at the wiring from the motor, trace it back and see if at some point a wire is connected to the chassis. It may not so wired in which case your job will be easier. As I said post some pics of the disassembled loco and drive that would help you proceed.

Here's another video of a tank of a similar vintage to yours which may help you: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Ad9X0VRaNok I couldn't find any of the engine you mention but the principles are the same.

I did find this from a company that does DCC conversions which looks like it could apply to your loco:

"This is an interesting conversion. The loco is an old Hornby Scotsman with standard 3 pole motor built into the live chassis. The motor terminal connected to the chassis is simply isolated by cutting the insulation collar to the insulated brush in half and using it to isolate both brushes".

So it looks like the motor needs isolating.
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Old 01-29-2016, 05:29 AM   #5
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My loco motor setup looks like this





https://m.facebook.com/photo.php?fbi...&ref=bookmarks
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Old 01-29-2016, 06:04 AM   #6
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The picture is just so small I cant tell much from it. Can you identify the motor brushes? As that quote I gave you it says there is a plastic insulator on top of both brushes, it says to cut this in half so you use the other half to insulate the other brush.

In the mean time please post a better pic with a close up of the motor installed and one just showing it removed.

I can see it better now. The brushes will be about where you are pointing.
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Old 01-29-2016, 06:18 AM   #7
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I've seen the facebook pics now which are clearer. Looks like that wire on top is grounding one of the motor contacts to the motor frame, cant tell which one but it will need isolating. Once you've done that you can proceed with the decoder install. The wheel current picks up are: Right side going to the red decoder wire and black going to left. The grey and orange go to the motor contacts, doesn't matter which but if it runs backwards just swap them over. The other wires will be for lighting.
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Old 01-29-2016, 10:37 AM   #8
DonR
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On a loco of that age you should do a stall test to determine
which decoder to buy. Older locos often draw too much for
the typical decoder and will wipe out a 1 amp decoder.
Decoders are available with higher ratings.

Before you disconnect the wires from the motor note which
tab was connected to the right rail feed. The decoder instructions
will tell you which wire to connect there thus the
loco will go forward when you push forward button.

After the installation and before applying power do a
short test. Set a multimeter to ohms. Probe each motor lead with
the other probe on the the frame. If you get a reading find how
that happens and correct it.

Don
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Old 01-29-2016, 12:39 PM   #9
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That's a good tip of Don's about checking for any shorts before putting it on a powered track. It's to check the motor connections to the decoder are not touching anything else and the motor is properly isolated. Let us know how you get on. Btw you'll need some small diameter heatshrink to insulate the connections. Mount the decoder on a piece of double sided foam tape.
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Old 01-29-2016, 06:08 PM   #10
..TrainMaster..
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Oh... so what I'm trying to achieve is removing the earthing from the locomotive frame and making the current earth through the right power rail via the decoder?
My scotsman is earthen through a tension spring that holds the brushes in place. One side of the tension spring is already insulated in tubing so it can't touch the brush it sits against(which I guess counts as isolating it?) So in theory if I do the same with the other side and run all the circuitry through the decoder it should work?
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