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Old 07-03-2019, 12:15 PM   #51
Panther
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When I rebuild a Marx motor, I disassemble it down as far as possible. I then soak all the parts in Carburetor cleaner for 30 minutes MAXIMUM. Every part will come out looking absolutely new. I the use soapy warm water and a brush to clean them. I then rinse them in clean water and use compressed air to blow off the water.
The only part I do not place into the carburetor cleaner is the E Unit coil.

Dan
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Old 07-03-2019, 02:11 PM   #52
Millstonemike
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Nice. So the carb cleaner doesn't affect the armature winding enamel?

I blasted a tin plate chassis and rinsed it in water to remove all the sand. I shook it off and then immediately placed it in a hot oven. Rust started to develop by the time is was dry.

Now I use 91% alcohol in a spray bottle to rinse parts. It's cheap and it's in my local supermarket.
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Old 07-03-2019, 06:01 PM   #53
Panther
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No it does not effect the winding's. I also want to make it clear I do not exceed 30 minutes, and I clean them immediately. I let the parts drip in the dunking basket after removing it from the carburetor cleaned. once pretty much stopped dripping I place the basket into a plastic coffee can with warm soapy water. I the rinse the parts in clean water as I brush them off. I immediately blow them off with air, and place them into a small container with paper towels.
I completely disassemble the E-Unit and unsolder the coil. I re-wrap the coil with new tape, and set aside until ready to put it all back together. A helpful hint. If the wire to the coil is broken off at the coil body itself, after you remove the tape you can unwind a bit of the wire to make up for what is broken off, onew wind is usually enough. If it's the center wire next to the core, you can also add a bit of wire at that point and save the coil.
If you look at the third rail pickup it appears to be almost new. What I do is place it bottom side down on a flat block of metal. I the use a Flat faced punch to flatten out the grooves from the back side. I the go back and fill in the back portion with a bit of solder in case at some point it gets worn completely through the copper, it won't have a hole. I then run the third rail pickup across a medium grit sponge centered sanding block. then over scotchbrite to polish. The pickups will look like new. You can see in the photos at the blue arrows where it didn't get completely pounded out. But still makes a big difference in the finished appearance. The entire part will come out of the carburetor cleaner looking like new but all the dings and wear are still present.

Dan
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Old 07-03-2019, 08:20 PM   #54
Millstonemike
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Originally Posted by Panther View Post
No it does not effect the winding's. I also want to make it clear I do not exceed 30 minutes, and I clean them immediately. I let the parts drip in the dunking basket after removing it from the carburetor cleaned. once pretty much stopped dripping I place the basket into a plastic coffee can with warm soapy water. I the rinse the parts in clean water as I brush them off. I immediately blow them off with air, and place them into a small container with paper towels.
I completely disassemble the E-Unit and unsolder the coil. I re-wrap the coil with new tape, and set aside until ready to put it all back together. A helpful hint. If the wire to the coil is broken off at the coil body itself, after you remove the tape you can unwind a bit of the wire to make up for what is broken off, onew wind is usually enough. If it's the center wire next to the core, you can also add a bit of wire at that point and save the coil.
If you look at the third rail pickup it appears to be almost new. What I do is place it bottom side down on a flat block of metal. I the use a Flat faced punch to flatten out the grooves from the back side. I the go back and fill in the back portion with a bit of solder in case at some point it gets worn completely through the copper, it won't have a hole. I then run the third rail pickup across a medium grit sponge centered sanding block. then over scotchbrite to polish. The pickups will look like new. You can see in the photos at the blue arrows where it didn't get completely pounded out. But still makes a big difference in the finished appearance. The entire part will come out of the carburetor cleaner looking like new but all the dings and wear are still present.

Dan
All solid tips from well honed experience.
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Old 07-04-2019, 09:30 AM   #55
LostInHoboken
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Originally Posted by Panther View Post
No it does not effect the winding's. I also want to make it clear I do not exceed 30 minutes, and I clean them immediately. I let the parts drip in the dunking basket after removing it from the carburetor cleaned. once pretty much stopped dripping I place the basket into a plastic coffee can with warm soapy water. I the rinse the parts in clean water as I brush them off. I immediately blow them off with air, and place them into a small container with paper towels.
I completely disassemble the E-Unit and unsolder the coil. I re-wrap the coil with new tape, and set aside until ready to put it all back together. A helpful hint. If the wire to the coil is broken off at the coil body itself, after you remove the tape you can unwind a bit of the wire to make up for what is broken off, onew wind is usually enough. If it's the center wire next to the core, you can also add a bit of wire at that point and save the coil.
If you look at the third rail pickup it appears to be almost new. What I do is place it bottom side down on a flat block of metal. I the use a Flat faced punch to flatten out the grooves from the back side. I the go back and fill in the back portion with a bit of solder in case at some point it gets worn completely through the copper, it won't have a hole. I then run the third rail pickup across a medium grit sponge centered sanding block. then over scotchbrite to polish. The pickups will look like new. You can see in the photos at the blue arrows where it didn't get completely pounded out. But still makes a big difference in the finished appearance. The entire part will come out of the carburetor cleaner looking like new but all the dings and wear are still present.

Dan
I may or may not have the intestinal fortitude to do a motor deep cleaning. We will have to see how far I get with the cosmetics. But thanks for sharing this info - it might come in handy after all.
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Old 07-04-2019, 09:32 AM   #56
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Paint removal, pass #1.
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Old 07-04-2019, 09:33 AM   #57
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A lot of tarnish underneath - probably why my pop repainted it!
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Old 07-10-2019, 06:19 PM   #58
tjcruiser
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Panther -- great tips!

Hoboken -- You're halfway there! Nice work! If you're game and patient, the Dremel stainless brush will polish that right up. Here's one of mine ... first just after strip; second after stainless brush ...

Cheers,

TJ
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Old 07-12-2019, 07:58 AM   #59
LostInHoboken
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Panther -- great tips!

Hoboken -- You're halfway there! Nice work! If you're game and patient, the Dremel stainless brush will polish that right up. Here's one of mine ... first just after strip; second after stainless brush ...

Cheers,

TJ
Yes, I did manage to shine her up pretty nice with a combination of steel wool and some Dremel brushing. Already put a mist coat on the shell, and put it in my homemade box oven for a half hour. Not sure if I had the shell in long enough, but I don’t know that it matters too much at this point? I’m going to try for a couple more coats this weekend, and going to try longer “baking” times. Is an hour inside the oven too long? Using a 150 watt bulb. Hopefully I’ll have photos soon.

PS Your cleanup looks terrific!
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Old 07-12-2019, 11:14 AM   #60
Millstonemike
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Originally Posted by LostInHoboken View Post
Yes, I did manage to shine her up pretty nice with a combination of steel wool and some Dremel brushing. Already put a mist coat on the shell, and put it in my homemade box oven for a half hour. Not sure if I had the shell in long enough, but I don’t know that it matters too much at this point? I’m going to try for a couple more coats this weekend, and going to try longer “baking” times. Is an hour inside the oven too long? Using a 150 watt bulb. Hopefully I’ll have photos soon.

PS Your cleanup looks terrific!
You could poke an oven meat thermometer into the box to gauge the baking temp. From what I've read here, my perception is 150 to 200 deg F is the right range. Others may have better info. I use a box in the summer sun ... more like a "quick dry" rather than a bake.
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