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Old 08-10-2019, 08:10 AM   #31
ftauss
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Call it what you want but with the word tariffs in the title it is political. Just your hidden way of pushing your agenda.
Every thin is political to a lefty. Even their breakfast cereal. They just can't help themselves.

And how do you like buying toys from a country that has real, actual concentration camps? Would you have bought Marklin from Germany in the 1930s?
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Old 08-10-2019, 10:06 AM   #32
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Every thin is political to a lefty. Even their breakfast cereal. They just can't help themselves.

And how do you like buying toys from a country that has real, actual concentration camps? Would you have bought Marklin from Germany in the 1930s?
And it appears political to you too.
You do realize that almost everything you buy or use is either manufactured in or assembled in or contains PRC manufactured parts in it...so you too are supporting and buying from a country that has real, actual concentration camps. Welcome to the 21st century.
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Old 08-10-2019, 04:33 PM   #33
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I think overall the long history of US policy toward China must certainly be seen as one of failure. It started in the 74 I think when nixon "opened China". But this was in the context of the cold war and to my knowledge had nothing to do with economic interests. Some time around deng xioa peng they decided to abandon their economic model and move to a more free market model less political freedoms.
I can clearly recall hearing over and over from whatever talking head got air time that it was "inevitable" China would politically liberalize as a consequence... Didn't work at that way. So now we have just about a 20 trillion per year China with regional ambitions that is surely not our friend but also surely not an enemy in direct conflict either to deal with.. And absolutely not a clue what to do about. Clearly this is something that occurred over a 40 year period ... Under administrations of all stripes...so there's no easy fix and any better solution will take years of effort through multiple administrations...
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Old 08-10-2019, 05:11 PM   #34
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Here is a link about tariffs. It maybe too early to tell though.

https://www.breitbart.com/economy/20...-fell-in-july/
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Old 08-10-2019, 10:11 PM   #35
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Well, then, somebody better tell BLI to lower their prices then.....
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Old 08-11-2019, 08:19 AM   #36
Frisco Firefly
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Well, then, somebody better tell BLI to lower their prices then.....
Hey, wait until the big $15 kicks in and everyone's wages go up accordingly. The price of everything will be going up.

But since everyone will be making more money they can afford it. Problem solved.
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Old 08-11-2019, 04:43 PM   #37
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Here is a link about tariffs. It maybe too early to tell though.

https://www.breitbart.com/economy/20...-fell-in-july/
It's not too early to tell, you just have to understand how tariffs work.

Tariffs don't raise prices. What they do is force importers (NOT the country against which the tariff is invoked) to pay an additional fee to import the item. Importers may chose to pass this cost on to the consumer as a higher price, or not. Many chose not to, especially at first, because the higher price makes their goods less competitive. Often they will find a way to reduce costs somewhere else. The problem is that as the cost of the tariff drags out over time, it can get harder and harder to offset the cost

Even if some suppliers do end up raising prices, that doesn't necessarily mean that the price increase will be felt throughout the broader economy. Goods with very elastic demand can drive people to purchase substitutes instead, with the result that price indices may actually fall.

And of course, there are other issues with tariffs, most notably retaliation. Ask anyone in the Agriculture industry, which sells a lot of products to China, how well things are working out.
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Old 08-11-2019, 04:50 PM   #38
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Hey, wait until the big $15 kicks in and everyone's wages go up accordingly. The price of everything will be going up.

But since everyone will be making more money they can afford it. Problem solved.
There is no direct relationship between an increase in minimum wage and prices for goods. COSTS will increase, but that doesn't necessarily mean that the business will find it necessary to raise prices. It also doesn't necessarily affect wages for any other employees at the company. It COULD, but it's not guaranteed. Only small business operating with very thin profit margins have no choice but to raise prices, and even then, unless the demand for that company's products is inelastic, they may not chose to do so.

And since wages at the low end of the scale are generally not saved by those who receive them, the immediate economic benefits generally offset the higher costs over the broader economy.
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Old 08-11-2019, 10:05 PM   #39
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There is no direct relationship between an increase in minimum wage and prices for goods. COSTS will increase, but that doesn't necessarily mean that the business will find it necessary to raise prices. It also doesn't necessarily affect wages for any other employees at the company. It COULD, but it's not guaranteed. Only small business operating with very thin profit margins have no choice but to raise prices, and even then, unless the demand for that company's products is inelastic, they may not chose to do so.

And since wages at the low end of the scale are generally not saved by those who receive them, the immediate economic benefits generally offset the higher costs over the broader economy.
That's fabulous news. Now I don't have to be concerned with prices going up. Means more money in my pocket.

So what about the restaurant service help that only get a little over $2 an hour because they get tips. If they now will be getting a living wage we won't have to tip them. I always tip 15 to 20%. I may eat out more. The meals will be cheaper if we don't have to tip.
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Old 08-11-2019, 10:12 PM   #40
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There is no direct relationship between an increase in minimum wage and prices for goods. COSTS will increase, but that doesn't necessarily mean that the business will find it necessary to raise prices. It also doesn't necessarily affect wages for any other employees at the company. It COULD, but it's not guaranteed. Only small business operating with very thin profit margins have no choice but to raise prices, and even then, unless the demand for that company's products is inelastic, they may not chose to do so.

And since wages at the low end of the scale are generally not saved by those who receive them, the immediate economic benefits generally offset the higher costs over the broader economy.
My local car wash was 20 to vacuum and wash my truck.Last time I went in it was 24 and I asked what happened. They said the minimum wage went up.
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