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Old 07-17-2019, 11:45 AM   #81
Panther
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Originally Posted by LostInHoboken View Post
Yes, I guess I have become confused by the various suggestions from several folks. Why do you not prime metal? Anyways, I think I’m into it this far, and the Krylon Red paint was not giving any coverage at all after three or more coats.

As for the baking, I have a cardboard box with a 150 watt bulb, and it does get pretty hot in there.

I will give the primer a light wet sanding and continue on with the Krylon Red, and hope for the best.
The reason I do not prime, is because when I bake, it allows the pores of the metal to expand, which allows the paint to flow and adhere directly to the metal. You are trying to make paint, adhere to a non smooth and bumpy surface.
Not trying to be confrontational, but the smooth surface of the metal is much smoother than the primer. That is what is giving paint finish a rough appearance IMO.
I feel the reason automotive paint and other type professional paints are smoother, is the fact they are a paint that is hardened by a chemical reaction with the catalyst. Spray cans with the exception of one brand I know of does not use a hardener. Sorry but if you want a smooth surface the primer has to go. Again, this is just my experience. In addition the light bulb box may not reach 160 degrees, test with a thermometer to make sure, it is also a key part to the process.

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Old 07-17-2019, 11:52 AM   #82
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Good point Dan with sticking to one method. Your finished paint jobs come out fantastic. That is one reason I backed off on adding to suggestions. His finished product will be a whole lot better than his starting point.
Please feel free to add to the mix. If my method doesn't work for some reason, yours may work better. I do agree sticking to one method would be the best idea. Which method is best, Just try them.

With the heat I used 3 different temperatures. First about 110, that didn't seem to work very well, then I went to 200, I think a bit overdone. So I split the difference and was very pleased with the results.

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Old 07-17-2019, 02:27 PM   #83
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The reason I do not prime, is because when I bake, it allows the pores of the metal to expand, which allows the paint to flow and adhere directly to the metal. ...
Dan
Interesting. It's my understanding that primer has ingredients that "etch" the metal for adhesion. I don't prime because I sandblast the metal. That seems to fully etch the surface - smooth to the touch but visually it has a uniform matte-like appearance.

I did try primer once on an unrelated project (Rustoleum rattlecan grey). It left a horrible bumpy surface. And it took lots of effort to smooth it out. Never again.
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Old 07-17-2019, 07:09 PM   #84
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Originally Posted by Millstonemike View Post
Interesting. It's my understanding that primer has ingredients that "etch" the metal for adhesion. I don't prime because I sandblast the metal. That seems to fully etch the surface - smooth to the touuch but visually it has a uniform matte-like appearance.

I did try primer once on an unrelated project (Rustoleum rattlecan grey). It left a horrible bumpy surface. And it took lots of effort to smooth it out. Never again.
This may be where I am at the moment. Live and learn!
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Old 07-17-2019, 07:44 PM   #85
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My 2 cents is I never ever use Rustoleum products. I have nothing but grief when I did try them. The problems were poor finish, took forever to dry. My go to is Krylon for normal colors, and some colors I resort to automotive Dupli-color. Take it for what it’s worth.
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Old Yesterday, 11:12 AM   #86
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My 2 cents is I never ever use Rustoleum products. I have nothing but grief when I did try them. The problems were poor finish, took forever to dry. My go to is Krylon for normal colors, and some colors I resort to automotive Dupli-color. Take it for what it’s worth.
Completely agree, you won't beat Krylon.

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Old Yesterday, 11:21 AM   #87
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Originally Posted by Millstonemike View Post
Interesting. It's my understanding that primer has ingredients that "etch" the metal for adhesion. I don't prime because I sandblast the metal. That seems to fully etch the surface - smooth to the touch but visually it has a uniform matte-like appearance.

I did try primer once on an unrelated project (Rustoleum rattlecan grey). It left a horrible bumpy surface. And it took lots of effort to smooth it out. Never again.
I agree with your conclusion, I think the key to a smooth and glossy finish is the sandblasting. I think the process of not using primer was at least in my experience from being too anxious to get it done. Waiting for 2 or 3 coats of primer to dry took too much time. I found out I liked the results better without the primer.
IO live in a very arid region, when I sandblast I try to keep it to what I will be painting right away. However I have wrapped parts in brown painter papers, WITHOUT any protective coating, and they have retained the metal finish without rusting. This of course is only a few days at best.

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Old Yesterday, 12:50 PM   #88
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I use primer mainly from not having access to blasting solutions. If I were doing an excessive amount of restoring, I might consider getting all the necessary equipment, but it is too expensive, for the low amount of restoring that I do. I never have problems with Krylon Ultramaxx primer. After I strip a body, I use a Drexel Stainless brush wheels, then thoroughly wipe everything down with isopropyl alcohol, immediately before spraying primer. Once I know the surface is smooth, I then spray the finish color, in 2-3 coats. This is what works or me.
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