Automobiles, Trucks and Buses for O-Gauge: 09-13-19: Cord - Page 2 - Model Train Forum - the complete model train resource
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Old 09-14-2019, 03:57 PM   #11
PENNSY484
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Very nice Lee. I used to enjoy your posts years ago back when you were first figuring out how best to make the superstreets look more realistic. Do you have any current videos of your street/road system? YouTube Channel?
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Old 09-14-2019, 04:59 PM   #12
Millstonemike
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Thanks Lee.
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Old 09-14-2019, 06:35 PM   #13
Deane Johnson
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That L-29 white convertible shown in one of the early photos in this thread would certain draw some attention cruising down the street. One would need to be wearing the proper vintage clothing though to make it complete.
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Old 09-15-2019, 09:55 AM   #14
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Thanks, richard. Good to hear from you.

Hupmobile and Graham were too other long-established companies (Auburn had been founded in 1900) that could not compete with the big boys either. The time leading up to WWII was rather rough on the auto industry, and size mattered in any survival plans.
My brother had an old supercharged 1936 Graham in the 50's, that was before they were worth any significant money. I'm not sure what he paid for it, but I know it wasn't much. It was decently fast for the time, but I don't recall blasting G-forces when accelerating. It was the 4-door model, not one of the cool looking models.
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Old 09-15-2019, 10:04 AM   #15
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My brother had an old supercharged 1936 Graham in the 50's, that was before they were worth any significant money. I'm not sure what he paid for it, but I know it wasn't much. It was decently fast for the time, but I don't recall blasting G-forces when accelerating. It was the 4-door model, not one of the cool looking models.
A supercharged Graham had a lot of power for its class, back then. But that was relative to what else was available - zero to sixty in fifteen seconds was respectable at the time. Today, fifteen seconds is about twice what a workaday Civic sedan will take.

We've come a long way in 70 years!
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Old 09-15-2019, 10:10 AM   #16
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It was fast for an old sedan at the time, but by then some pretty healthy V8's were around that were more than a match. However, it was a cool curiosity, the only super charged car I had ever seen at the time. Living in the middle of Wyoming at the time, not much in automotive technology came around locally.
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Old 10-15-2019, 05:59 PM   #17
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I read in the September 23 issue of Autoweek that what's left of Cord was sold at auction on Labor day for $88,000. The Buyer got the rights to produce licensed merchandise, parts and replica cars.
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Old 10-20-2019, 02:03 PM   #18
Richard E
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Thanks, richard. Good to hear from you.

Hupmobile and Graham were too other long-established companies (Auburn had been founded in 1900) that could not compete with the big boys either. The time leading up to WWII was rather rough on the auto industry, and size mattered in any survival plans.
Kaiser-Frazer acquired the assets of Graham-Page and planed to introduce a postwar Graham.
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Old 10-20-2019, 04:48 PM   #19
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That L-29 white convertible shown in one of the early photos in this thread would certain draw some attention cruising down the street. One would need to be wearing the proper vintage clothing though to make it complete.
Reminds me of missing an opportunity.

I had power of attorney to sell a senior's coop. It had to be cleaned out. Some contents were sold to a antique dealer while other stuff went to family. A lot of 50's clothing and luggage went to the trash hauler.

My friend and neighbor restored a 1950's Lincoln Cosmopolitan. Perusing the the car's repair manual, I noticed an option for matching luggage. It looked just like the jettisoned coop luggage. I bet all the clothes would have provided a period outfit or two for him and his gal.
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Old 10-20-2019, 05:43 PM   #20
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"... and a 170+ HP engine. That power and lighter weight than the sedan gave it a top speed of over 115 mph (or some people claim up to 124 mph, which seams unrealistic to me). Regardless, it was one of the fastest cars in the world then."

I had a 1980 Triumph TR7 convertible. It weighed 2,800 lbs. It's 2 lt. engine, hampered by emission restraints of the time, produced all of 92 HP. I ran it up to 121 mph on interstate 80 in NJ. On the same stretch with the top down it max'ed out at 115 mph - increased wind turbulence causing extra drag.

On level ground, weight is not the determining factor for max speed. The most significant factor is the car's coefficient of wind resistance. The power needed to push through the air is the mathematical square of the speed. That is, to go twice s fast requires 4 times the power to push through the air. Rolling resistance and other factors come into play but aerodynamics rule max speed.

That's why the national speed limit was reduced to 55 after the 1970's oil embargos. Reducing speed from 70 mph to 50 will nearly halve the wind drag thus yielding much improved gas mileage reducing oil consumption.

While the TR7's limited horsepower was a detriment and it's wedge shape no guarantee of an aerodynamically efficient design, it did attract the attention of many "phillies"
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