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O Scale Atlas, Bachman, Hornby, K-Line, Lionel and classic toy train discussion.


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Old 11-19-2019, 11:12 AM   #21
Millstonemike
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Quote:
Originally Posted by santafe158 View Post
I believe the rear coupler on the observation car is likely an add on modification (and apparently a common one). Mine was rather poorly done as no cuts were made to the rear railing apron, it was simply bent upward. Yours looks like another one that was shared with me where two cuts were made on either side of the coupler and the material folded neatly out of the way.
That would irk me. I'd be cutting and repairing the bent portion like T-man's.
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Old 11-19-2019, 06:54 PM   #22
T-Man
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I went through the Tandem Lionel site and did not see any of the observation cars having a rear coupler. Most descriptions referred to one coupler.
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Old 11-20-2019, 12:10 AM   #23
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Those roofs look just fine.
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Old 11-20-2019, 06:14 AM   #24
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Well, the observation car's extra coupler hack made me look at a couple of prewar 612 observation cars I plan to restore; an early version and a late version. Since there's two, one will need a coupler at the observation end.

I think I can use a CP-7 latch coupler's "bend" to clear the slight overhang of the railing. The "twist" will need to be removed, a hole drilled and then attached with a screw as there won't be a slot to hold the coupler up. Then tested to see if the recessed version will clear curves. On the mating cars there's enough up-down slop in this style coupler that a slight height difference won't matter. The pic is of the later version 612. The early versions' overhang is a tad shallower.

CP-7.JPG
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Old 11-22-2019, 06:15 AM   #25
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Prep is everything

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Originally Posted by HarborBelt1970 View Post
Those roofs look great. Did you have to do anything to prepare/smooth out the old surface before painting it or did the paint just dry out as smooth as it looks?
Can't speak for the OP, but having worked in a body shop in my younger years, I can tell you that a good paint job is 90% proper prep.

Scratches, dents, dings, etc. are magnified when paint is applied so doing the grunt work is vital.

If not going down to bare metal, I wet sand with progressively finer grits and use sandable primer until I get a smooth, even surface.

I also prefer to use an airbrush which allows me to better control the amount of paint applied vs spray bombs that usually spit out too much paint and cover up details on smaller objects.

And I can choose almost any color or mix my own to do touch ups without regards to whether it comes in a spray.
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Old 11-22-2019, 10:50 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by Millstonemike View Post
That would irk me. I'd be cutting and repairing the bent portion like T-man's.
I'll likely consider it at some point.
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Old 11-22-2019, 10:55 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnboy View Post
Can't speak for the OP, but having worked in a body shop in my younger years, I can tell you that a good paint job is 90% proper prep.

Scratches, dents, dings, etc. are magnified when paint is applied so doing the grunt work is vital.

If not going down to bare metal, I wet sand with progressively finer grits and use sandable primer until I get a smooth, even surface.

I also prefer to use an airbrush which allows me to better control the amount of paint applied vs spray bombs that usually spit out too much paint and cover up details on smaller objects.

And I can choose almost any color or mix my own to do touch ups without regards to whether it comes in a spray.
You're definitely correct on all points. There was very little prep work with these other than wiping the grime off them before applying the paint over the original. The car bodies weren't perfect, so I didn't really want the roofs to be either, just better than they were. There are definitely some spots where you can faintly see the outlines of some of the paint chips I painted over, but I like that part of the history and you can only see it if you look closely. If I was going for a 100% restoration on all areas of the cars, I would have spent a lot more time prepping.
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Old 11-22-2019, 12:43 PM   #28
Millstonemike
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnboy View Post
Can't speak for the OP, but having worked in a body shop in my younger years, I can tell you that a good paint job is 90% proper prep.

Scratches, dents, dings, etc. are magnified when paint is applied so doing the grunt work is vital.

If not going down to bare metal, I wet sand with progressively finer grits and use sandable primer until I get a smooth, even surface.

I also prefer to use an airbrush which allows me to better control the amount of paint applied vs spray bombs that usually spit out too much paint and cover up details on smaller objects.

And I can choose almost any color or mix my own to do touch ups without regards to whether it comes in a spray.
+1, prep is key. But primer & sanding smooth is not my first choice for model trains. Unlike a car's body, model trains have to many "details" for priming and sanding, especially locomotives. Removing paint down to the metal (sandblast, chemical, etc.) typically provides a good surface for a first coat sans primer. Dings can be filled with epoxy and sanded smooth if necessary prior to painting.

Here's a Lionel Prewar electric Loco that was sandblasted and painted with Rustoleum satin. You can see the detail that would be problematic for priming and sanding.

Project 1.jpg
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