Help a new modeler to get started. - Page 3 - Model Train Forum - the complete model train resource
Model Train Forum - the complete model train resource

Go Back   Model Train Forum - the complete model train resource > Model Train Workshop > Beginner Q & A
Forgotten your password?

Beginner Q & A If you're new to model trains, stop in here!


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 07-22-2019, 06:30 PM   #21
sid
Engineer
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Mena Arkansas
Posts: 647
Scales Modeled: N
some easy layouts for beginners . not huge and can probably be made pretty cheap or for a lot less $$$$$ . haha hope its ok to post a link...
http://www.cke1st.com/m_train2.htm
sid is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 08-01-2019, 09:02 PM   #22
Trucker Sam
Hobo
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: NW Lower Michigan
Posts: 12
Scales Modeled: N
Quote:
Originally Posted by sid View Post
some easy layouts for beginners . not huge and can probably be made pretty cheap or for a lot less $$$$$ . haha hope its ok to post a link...
http://www.cke1st.com/m_train2.htm
That’s nice, but... I didn’t go with N scale to go small. Small Cars and buildings, yes. But big layout.
Trucker Sam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2020, 09:37 PM   #23
Homeless by Choice
Brakeman
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 199
Scales Modeled: HO
Quote:
Originally Posted by traction fan View Post
Since which turnout is "best" is a matter of individual opinion, I'll just give you some information on them, and let you make your own choice.

The top file, "All about turnouts," contains the info, I suggest reading it first. The other files are referenced in the main(top) file, and contain additional, more detailed, information on specific items mentioned.


Attachment 468340

Attachment 468342

Attachment 468344

Attachment 468346

Attachment 468348



regards:

Traction Fan
Traction Fan does a good job of explaining the hand made turnout process in his "How I scratch build turnouts new(8).pdf" paper. I am going to build HO turnouts using MEC Code 83 NS Rail. I found the suggested tools, gauges, and PC ties but I can’t find any wood ties.

• What do you use for wood ties?
• Do you make your own?
• Do you have any suggestions?

Thank you,
LeRoy
Homeless by Choice is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Old 01-17-2020, 12:39 PM   #24
traction fan
Station Master
 
traction fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: San Diego
Posts: 3,559
Scales Modeled: N
West Wood ties? Wood ties?We don't need no stinking wood ties!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Homeless by Choice View Post
Traction Fan does a good job of explaining the hand made turnout process in his "How I scratch build turnouts new(8).pdf" paper. I am going to build HO turnouts using MEC Code 83 NS Rail. I found the suggested tools, gauges, and PC ties but I can’t find any wood ties.

• What do you use for wood ties?
• Do you make your own?
• Do you have any suggestions?

Thank you,
LeRoy


Leroy;

As covered (pretty thoroughly I thought) in the file, I don't use wood ties at all. I use all PC board ties. The reason, (again, explained in the file) is that when I had used the mix of a few PC ties and mostly wood ties, common in other turnout building methods, I had problems with the copper cladding coming off the epoxy base of the PC ties and ruining the turnout. I resolved that since I was going to spend the time needed to scratchbuild a turnout, I wanted the resulting turnout to be as strong and rugged as I could make it. With all PC ties, if one cladding joint breaks free of the tie, the others will keep the rails in their proper position. I have made dozens of turnouts with all PC ties, and I haven't had a single one fail.

As it happens I do make my own (PC) ties by cutting PC board, but I don't recommend doing this. It requires special tools, and extra effort. PC ties are available commercially from Clover House, in many sizes.

If you want, for whatever reason, to use wood ties, Campbell Scale Models sells them, or you could cut your own from basswood dimensional beam stock. I'd use 1/16" square stock for N-scale and perhaps 1/8" x 1/16" for HO-scale. Real ties are not square, but rectangular, except for those used on bridges. However, an N-scale tie is pretty small, and somewhat fragile if thinner than 1/16" thick. When ballasted, the extra thickness doesn't show anyway.

My only suggestions are:

!) Read the file again and use it as a set of instructions as you go along. After you have built a few turnouts, you will be able to build more without consulting the directions, in the time-honored, manly, maner!

2) Use all PC ties. It makes a much stronger turnout.

regards;

Traction Fan

How I scratch build turnouts new(8).pdf (Just in case you lost the earlier copies)
__________________
To Puget sound, Electrified!

Last edited by traction fan; 01-20-2020 at 11:55 AM..
traction fan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2020, 09:27 AM   #25
MichaelE
Station Master
 
MichaelE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Southern Illinois
Posts: 2,582
Scales Modeled: HO
Märklin is a proprietary AC model railroad system. It is not interchangeable with DC or DCC model railroads, although Märklin can be DCC and most of it today is, the same as other European DCC equipment.

Their couplers are often current-carrying and is used for lighting coaches and other electrically operated accessories on the coaches such as music, operating pans on restaurant coaches, and other lighting effects.

There is no standard coupler in Europe for use on models; the prototype coupler would be quite impossible to use for HO modeling although rivet counter model builders and Märklin have replicated these, mostly for display purposes.

There are several popular couplers in use though and some are compatible with others and some are not.

Close-couplers used on Fleischmann, Roco, Pico, and other manufacturers are mostly used on passenger wagons and the coupling is bellows to bellows close. You can barely see light through some of these cars coupled together.

Ironically enough, these same manufacturers use the Roco type hook-and-loop type coupler on their locomotives. Don't ask me why. It's one of the mysteries of European model railroading. Locomotives from most major brands include a pair of both types of couplers.

TRIX also uses a universal coupler in that it mates with the Roco hook-and-loop type coupler very reliably, but it does not work with the Fleischman close-coupler. TRIX also includes a pair of different couplers with their locomotives and passenger wagons.

Fleischmann also uses another type of coupler on some of their rolling stock. It is not pictured in this post. It is not compatible with any other coupler so it must be changed out for swapping cars between trains or the consist must be kept together with this coupler.

A.C.M.E. uses yet a third design which may be due to being an Italian made product. They are not compatible with anything and must be changed out to one of the above types. They too include Roco style hook-and-loop type couplers.

Most European model railroaders opt for one of the two pictured, however, I use both depending upon what works better with the locomotive/ first car combination. All of my passenger coaches use the Fleischmann close coupler throughout the train. The one exception in my TRIX Era III/IV coaches and they use the TRIX universal coupler. It's only universal in that it will couple with Roco hook-and-loop type.

There are several other types available I won't go into here. These are the most common. European model railroaders will have a supply of different types of couplers to swap among their rolling stock.

Prototype couplers available from Märklin. Cumbersome and difficult to couple cars together without small hand tools.



Roco type coupler made by Fleischmann, Roco's is identical:



Fleishmann close-coupler for passenger coaches:

__________________
Deutsche-Bahn Eisenbahn modeling Oberbayern, western Austria, and northern Switzerland.
MichaelE is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2020, 02:45 PM   #26
tr1
Engineer
 
tr1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: s.e. Wisconsin
Posts: 918
Scales Modeled: 1/87th(HO)
NMRA weight guidelines.

What generally happens when you practice following the weight
NMRA guidelines for ones rolling stock?
thank you!
I need to get a postal scale
Regards,tr1
tr1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2020, 04:24 PM   #27
CTValleyRR
Train Master
 
CTValleyRR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: East Haddam, CT
Posts: 8,977
Scales Modeled: HO
Yes, a postal scale or a digital kitchen scale which is accurate to within 1/10th of an oz.

Cars that are too light generally don't track well, and may come off the rails more easily. Remember, it's a recommended practice, not mandatory, but if you're having trouble with derailments, underweight cars could be the issue.
__________________
Connecticut Valley Railroad -- A Branch of the New York, New Haven, And Hartford

"We don't stop playing because we grow old. We grow old because we stop playing." --George Bernard Shaw
CTValleyRR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2020, 06:21 PM   #28
traction fan
Station Master
 
traction fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: San Diego
Posts: 3,559
Scales Modeled: N
West Adding weight

Quote:
Originally Posted by tr1 View Post
What generally happens when you practice following the weight
NMRA guidelines for ones rolling stock?
thank you!
I need to get a postal scale
Regards,tr1
tr1;

What generally happens is that the cars stay on the track better. Unless there are other problems like wheels out of gage, track out of gage, turnouts that haven't been set to NMRA gage specs, etc. To do the most good, in terms of keeping a car on the track, weight should be as low, and close to the center, of the car as possible. I like to add weight to the center sill for example.
Metal wheels and metal trucks since you're an HO modeler, also help with weight, in addition to just being better wheels.
Bismuth alloy, which melts at a low enough temperature to be poured directly into plastic, is handy for getting weight into little nooks and crannies. "Lo Temp" is one brand.
Moldable lead is good for this too, if you can get any. The nanny state of California, in its never-ending crusade to over-regulate every aspect of every resident's life for him, has banned moldable lead.
N-scale cars tend to be pretty light in general, so I end up adding weight to most of them. I also tend to replace the flat sheet steel weights that come inside many cars, with brass, or some other non-magnetic material. I do this to prevent a car from being attracted to a magnetic uncoupling ramp, and moving when I'm trying to get it uncoupled.

Good luck, & have fun;

Traction Fan
__________________
To Puget sound, Electrified!
traction fan is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


» Visit These Sites:
LGB World

Or Our European Train Website ModelRailForum




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:36 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.