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Old 08-06-2013, 09:47 PM   #21
shaygetz
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Scales Modeled: HO, HOn30, N
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Quote:
Originally Posted by haphall View Post
As it turns out, O narrow gauge can use standard HO track, and HO narrow gauge can use standard N gauge track.
I would add...IF the O narrow gauge was On30 and the HO narrow gauge HOn30...
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Old 08-06-2013, 10:55 PM   #22
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Scales Modeled: O & N
Thanks for providing some new info, haphall. A lot of people seem to be confused by what narrow gauges are relative to scales.
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Old 03-03-2014, 09:33 AM   #23
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Scales Modeled: Mostly HO,... and a bunch of XMAS "O" and 027
Can anyone post a picture of OO gauge? Is it closer to HO or O gauge?
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Old 03-03-2014, 11:59 AM   #24
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Scales Modeled: HO
OO runs on HO scale track and is very similar in size.

OO is 1:76 scale, HO is 1:87.

OO is mostly European, and European equipment generally has a smaller profile than North American equipment, which means OO and HO end up looking exactly the same size, although the European equipment should actually be a tad smaller that their North American counterparts.

There was actually a thread on this exact subject (OO vs HO) a while ago on this forum.

https://www.modeltrainforum.com/showthread.php?t=13216

I'm sure there's also been others actually.
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Old 05-16-2014, 08:12 PM   #25
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As for which one is best suited to a person, it's all about the space you have, and your eyesight. I love the size of O scale trains, but it eats real estate if you want anything but an oval. I like N scale, but I can't see that well without the cheaters. G scale is fun, and if I have a barn I'd have G scale in the basement.
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Old 07-27-2014, 08:20 PM   #26
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I've been model railroading for a long time, and I have to say a reference like this would have been helpful many years ago.

The picture is great, but the thing that is missing is a real world object of known scale for comparison. One that I've seen uses a dollar bill (6") for comparison. For newcomers to the hobby, this would be roughly the size of the N scale locomotive.
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Old 11-13-2014, 08:37 PM   #27
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Scales Modeled: Standard, O, Marklin HO, HO/OO, Z, N, S, G, Lego RC, HWN O Gauge
You're forgetting Standard Gauge, 2 7/8 Gauge, and T Gauge
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Old 11-16-2014, 09:11 AM   #28
FM Trainmaster
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Size comparison of scales

Modelers who know better seem to carelessly use the word "scale," when they mean "gauge," which I believe is a source of massive confusion for those who don't understand the distinction. It's perpetuated right in the forum titles, here.

O-gauge is typically 1:43 scale, gauge referring to the rail profile (1-1/4" centers, etc.), and not the scale size. Most model rail gauges are at odds with the true scale of the locos, as necessitated by reasonably small layout tables.

This confusion really gets people, when you start discussing On30, which is really HO gauge in O scale (~1:43). :lol


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Old 11-16-2014, 09:37 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FM Trainmaster View Post
Modelers who know better seem to carelessly use the word "scale," when they mean "gauge," which I believe is a source of massive confusion for those who don't understand the distinction. It's perpetuated right in the forum titles, here.

O-gauge is typically 1:43 scale, gauge referring to the rail profile (1-1/4" centers, etc.), and not the scale size. Most model rail gauges are at odds with the true scale of the locos, as necessitated by reasonably small layout tables.

This confusion really gets people, when you start discussing On30, which is really HO gauge in O scale (~1:43). :lol


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O scale model trains are all proportioned 1:48 to the prototype?
Which is 1/48th the size of a real train?
O scale conveniently works out to 1/4 inch = 1 foot.

You could use 1/43 size structures and cars and trucks on the O layout. But they are a hair smaller then O?
That is what I always thought.
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Old 11-16-2014, 09:41 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FM Trainmaster View Post
O-gauge is typically 1:43 scale, gauge referring to the rail profile (1-1/4" centers, etc.), and not the scale size. Most model rail gauges are at odds with the true scale of the locos, as necessitated by reasonably small layout tables.
Actually, it depends on what area of the world you're in. In the US, O-scale is 1:48 for virtually all the manufacturers. In Europe, and probably other parts of the world, they use 1:43 as O-scale.

Ed, 1:43 scale is larger than 1:48 scale.
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