Another scenery question - Model Train Forum - the complete model train resource
Model Train Forum - the complete model train resource

Go Back   Model Train Forum - the complete model train resource > Model Train Workshop > Beginner Q & A
Forgotten your password?

Beginner Q & A If you're new to model trains, stop in here!


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 07-19-2019, 05:52 PM   #1
GNfan
Engineer
 
GNfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Tri-Cities, WA
Posts: 732
Scales Modeled: N
West Another scenery question

I opened one of my packages of Woodland Scenics trees, and was surprised at how delicate they are - one false move any you've got microscopic leaves everywhere! Is there something to tack them down better? Spray glue? Hairspray? Flat clear Krylon?
__________________
Chief Operating Officer of the Plywood Prairie Railroad.
Married to the Chief Financial Officer.
GNfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 07-19-2019, 08:11 PM   #2
CTValleyRR
Train Master
 
CTValleyRR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: East Haddam, CT
Posts: 8,557
Scales Modeled: HO
Either. Or a good dose of diluted matte medium or white glue. Some is going to come off no matter what, though. It shouldn't lose enough to really affect the appearance.
__________________
Connecticut Valley Railroad -- A Branch of the New York, New Haven, And Hartford

"We don't stop playing because we grow old. We grow old because we stop playing." --George Bernard Shaw
CTValleyRR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2019, 10:07 PM   #3
mesenteria
Dispatcher
 
mesenteria's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Comox, BC
Posts: 1,456
I don't know how these are constructed, but when I make my own coniferous trees, I spray the netting/filter material first liberally with Product 77 from 3M, and then sprinkle on the foam bits/flocking. Then, overspray with Stickum Hairspray to help to bind it in place with an 'exoskeleton' of sorts. Works quite well, but nothing of this nature will stand up to constant or imprudent handling.


If you end up with one or two denuded armatures once you have unpacked the commercial items, I would spray again, sprinkle something close to the original flocking, and then overspray the whole leafy part once more. Should be good for years.
mesenteria is online now   Reply With Quote
 
Old 07-19-2019, 10:30 PM   #4
GNfan
Engineer
 
GNfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Tri-Cities, WA
Posts: 732
Scales Modeled: N
When all else fails, read the instructions: The manufacturer recommends using a product of theirs called "Scenic Cement". At $7.49 for a 16oz bottle at modeltrainstuff.com, I think I'll get some.

On a personal note: I have never taken a layout anywhere close to this before. I've got the confidence to do it because of this place. Thanks, guys.
__________________
Chief Operating Officer of the Plywood Prairie Railroad.
Married to the Chief Financial Officer.
GNfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2019, 08:46 AM   #5
Gramps
Dispatcher
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Coastal Carolina
Posts: 1,558
Scales Modeled: HO then G back to HO
I had Mod Podge for another project and it worked on attaching the leaves to the tree trunks.
Gramps is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2019, 08:41 AM   #6
CTValleyRR
Train Master
 
CTValleyRR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: East Haddam, CT
Posts: 8,557
Scales Modeled: HO
Quote:
Originally Posted by GNfan View Post
When all else fails, read the instructions: The manufacturer recommends using a product of theirs called "Scenic Cement". At $7.49 for a 16oz bottle at modeltrainstuff.com, I think I'll get some.

On a personal note: I have never taken a layout anywhere close to this before. I've got the confidence to do it because of this place. Thanks, guys.
WS Scenic Cement is nothing more than clarified, diluted matte medium. Here is my formula for the homemade stuff, which is much cheaper. I use two mayonnaise jars.

Add 1/2 cup of matte medium to 2-1/2 cups filtered or distilled water (don't use the straight tap water -- the chemicals can cause unpredictable results). Using warmer water helps. Close the container and shake vigorously to mix. Open the container and stir in 6 drops of dishwashing liquid. Don't do this before shaking or you will end up with a foamy mess. Make sure it is thoroughly mixed.

Let stand overnight. The talc which is used as a dulling agent in the matte medium will settle out. Decant the liquid into another container and discard the sludge. You can use either an mister or a dropper to apply it, depending on the application. If you use a mister, clean it after use.

Good luck! Making scenery is one of my favorite tasks on a layout. I hope you grow to enjoy it as much as I do.
__________________
Connecticut Valley Railroad -- A Branch of the New York, New Haven, And Hartford

"We don't stop playing because we grow old. We grow old because we stop playing." --George Bernard Shaw
CTValleyRR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2019, 12:30 PM   #7
sid
Engineer
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Mena Arkansas
Posts: 648
Scales Modeled: N
? what is matte medium ?? is that a glue , white glue ?
sid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2019, 05:34 PM   #8
traction fan
Station Master
 
traction fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: San Diego
Posts: 3,114
Scales Modeled: N
West Matte Medium

Quote:
Originally Posted by sid View Post
? what is matte medium ?? is that a glue , white glue ?
sid;

Matte medium is an art supply item. It is used by artistic painters to give a flat look to a painting. It is also used by modelers as a form of liquid glue. Model railroaders use it to bond scenery materials like dirt, grass, leaves, etc. to the layout, or to bond leaves/foliage to model tree trunks.
I don't use it because of it's very high cost. White glue (Elmer's glue for example) diluted with water, and a little alcohol, will do the same scenery bonding tasks for a lot less money.
Matte medium has an art supply "cousin" called "gloss medium." As you can probably guess, it is used to make something look shiny, rather than flat, or dull.
Some model railroaders use gloss medium to make their layouts "water" look "wet" by making the surface shiny. Gloss medium is also expensive, just like matte medium. There is a craft product called "mod podge" that can do this same job, making model "water"look "wet" for much lower cost than gloss medium, or the even more expensive Woodland Scenics "realistic water" product.
Any of these products, including the Woodland Scenics ones, will do the same scenery tasks. The only difference is a very substantial difference in price. The "water" in the photos looks wet, but it's not. Both bodies of water were made with mod podge. A jar of mod podge cost me $3 at Walmart, several years ago. I'm still using the same jar today.

Traction Fan

Cape Rip. cliff & waves.JPG

Combined outflow of Black and Green rivers.jpg
__________________
To Puget sound, Electrified!
traction fan is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2019, 06:08 PM   #9
CTValleyRR
Train Master
 
CTValleyRR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: East Haddam, CT
Posts: 8,557
Scales Modeled: HO
Paint consists of two parts: a pigment and a medium. The pigment is the color that will end up on your surface, the medium enables it to flow, then binds it together and to the surface as it cures or evaporates.

Acrylic media come in two flavors: matte and gloss -- you can read "dull (or flat)" and "shiny". The gloss stuff works well for making water.

As traction fan says, it's expensive (although it you buy it at a big box art supply place with a coupon, it's not too bad). However, because it's intended to be used in art, it is more flexible when dry, doesn't flake off, is absolutely colorless, and doesn't discolor with age. I have never shied away from paying more for quality. Only you can decide if it's worth it for you.
__________________
Connecticut Valley Railroad -- A Branch of the New York, New Haven, And Hartford

"We don't stop playing because we grow old. We grow old because we stop playing." --George Bernard Shaw
CTValleyRR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2019, 06:25 PM   #10
sid
Engineer
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Mena Arkansas
Posts: 648
Scales Modeled: N
Thank You traction fan for that great explanation. I have been using just white glue (elmers by the gallon ) I know when i start on my new layout next year (maybe end of this year) im gunna need lots of stuff,. this one is way bigger than ive ever done. Again Thank you.
sid is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


» Visit These Sites:
LGB World

Or Our European Train Website ModelRailForum




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:28 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.