'ILLEGAL?' Flying Switch - Model Train Forum - the complete model train resource
Model Train Forum - the complete model train resource

Go Back   Model Train Forum - the complete model train resource > The Right of Way > North America
Forgotten your password?

North America Discuss Canadian and American Prototype railways.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 07-07-2017, 03:45 PM   #1
DonR
Train Master
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Jacksonville, Fl
Posts: 8,312
'ILLEGAL?' Flying Switch

I thought this old maneuver was banned years
ago, but here it is, for all to see on one of those
small regional railroads. It occurs around 5:56
in the video.

Note the switch men throwing the turnout just
after the loco clears, the car slowly rolls thru and
stops. The loco can then push the loco to it's
spot.


Any real railroaders out there. Is this practice still
being used?

Oh, and by the way, check out the track. MOW
apparently AWOL.

Don
DonR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2017, 03:10 AM   #2
Magic
Dispatcher
 
Magic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Reno Nv.
Posts: 2,001
Scales Modeled: HO 1950s Southern Pacific in So. California.
Everything I've read about this was that it's illegal.
Sometime in the 60s or 70s I believe.

Though I might use this for some of my industries on my layout. 1950s

Magic
__________________
The Magic RR build thread.
New layout starts at page 7.
https://www.modeltrainforum.com/showthread.php?t=22525
Magic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2017, 06:45 PM   #3
Krieglok
Dispatcher
 
Krieglok's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: NJ
Posts: 1,880
Scales Modeled: O, HO, N, OO
The flying switch move is usually regulated by rules of each individual railroad. It isn't illegal as far as the FRA is concerned, to my knowledge.

The railroad I work for, has banned the practice simply by saying the movement of cars not coupled to locomotives is prohibited. This includes drifting cars too.

You may be thinking of the practice of "Polling" cars with wood poles. This was a common practice into the 1970s until banned by law. This explains the presence of polling pockets on pre 1970s cars and locomotives... both prototype and model alike...

Tom
Krieglok is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2017, 08:47 AM   #4
gunrunnerjohn
Admin
 
gunrunnerjohn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: SE-PA, USA
Posts: 42,895
Scales Modeled: O-gauge 3-rail
Images: 3
It's just a poor man's hump yard.
__________________
MTH ASC Certified Tech, Factory Authorized Lionel Service, ERR Dealer
gunrunnerjohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2017, 10:42 AM   #5
Krieglok
Dispatcher
 
Krieglok's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: NJ
Posts: 1,880
Scales Modeled: O, HO, N, OO
Now that you said that, flat switching and kicking cars is another method banned by some railroads but embraced by others.

Some railroads are starting to get away from humping cars too. I don't why...

Tom
Krieglok is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2017, 10:57 AM   #6
gunrunnerjohn
Admin
 
gunrunnerjohn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: SE-PA, USA
Posts: 42,895
Scales Modeled: O-gauge 3-rail
Images: 3
Well, I saw a couple of videos where the humped cars kinda' got away from then and made a pretty hard landing, I suspect that's part of the issue with hump yards.
__________________
MTH ASC Certified Tech, Factory Authorized Lionel Service, ERR Dealer
gunrunnerjohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2017, 10:09 PM   #7
rogruth
Dispatcher
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Pembroke,Georgia
Posts: 1,005
Scales Modeled: 3 rail O
A flying switch was performed almost weekly at an interchange between the PRR and the B&O. It took less than 15 minutes to spot the car in the manner used. If the car had been spotted
in the legal way the move would have taken over an hour to do.
This info was from the train crew.
rogruth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2017, 08:00 AM   #8
railfancwb
Hobo
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krieglok View Post
Now that you said that, flat switching and kicking cars is another method banned by some railroads but embraced by others.



Some railroads are starting to get away from humping cars too. I don't why...



Tom


Composition of freight traffic is the major reason for disappearance of hump yards. Unit trains have increased their percentage if the total and they do not require switching between origin and destination. Intermodal - containers or trailers - are unit trains on the road even though they are loaded/unloaded individually. Humping is forbidden for some traffic such as automobile carriers because of potential cargo damage.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
railfancwb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2018, 11:55 AM   #9
J.Albert1949
Engineer
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 583
Old topic, but...

...Back when I worked in freight, we'd do flying switches now and then. It was something you would do only here and there as needed to save a lot of time otherwise.

As I recall, the rule book (Conrail) didn't actually "prohibit" it, but it did say that "drops of cars" should be avoided when practicable.

This was going on 30 years ago.
The railroads may have "tightened up" the rules since then.

Insofar as "kicking cars" when switching, that was fairly normal procedure for "flat switching" on yard and local jobs. Again, don't know what they're doing now.
J.Albert1949 is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


» Visit These Sites:
LGB World

Or Our European Train Website ModelRailForum




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:12 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.