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Just took delivery of a pair of 022 switches from eBay. They are clean, and I believe were serviced. Kids and I are excited, and hook them up after reading the included instructions. I first connect just using the track, and the voltage is enough to operate the close switch, but the far switch (8' away) doesn't even light up.

So, I decide to connect the fixed voltage terminals. I run wire to the far switch and test it out. All appears to work well. I now connect the second switch using fixed voltage, power up, and no good.

The first thing I notice is that I have to have a train on the track in order to get the controller bulbs light. Is that normal?

Second thing I notice is with 1033 transformer plugged in, but not turning power up to move the train, I can move the train slowly by holding either of the switch controllers in the forward or reverse position as if I was going to move the switch.

I just did some troubleshooting and there appears to be something wrong with the far switch. Are these straightforward to open and service? It appears there's something going on with the fixed voltage terminal, possibly shorting or not shorting as its supposed to when relying on the track voltage to operate the switches. What should I look for when I open it up? Also, can I hook one switch up using fixed voltage and the other using track voltage?

Sorry for the rambling... this was hard to describe. Maybe someone with experience can offer some diagnostic steps.
 

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Yard Master & Research
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This link may help. O22

Get them to move off the track first by testing. See the thread.

The 1033 diagram the first page explains the letters of the terminals.

So check your connections. Obviously it is not corrected right. The two threads have the information.
 

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Yard Master & Research
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Second Look

With switches, I bench test them first to check for smooth operation. I preach to have insulator pins on the inside rails of the y for the 022 switch.
If the engine moves when you operate the switch that means the outer rail is not connected and you are grounding the engine through the coil. Not good

The theory, The center rail powers the coils. The plug by-passes this connection. The three top terminals operate the switch. The center is ground or common like the outer rails. if you connect either of the outer terminal posts to the center post the switch moves if it is not in the right position. To test you need to go back and forth to see how it moves and the engine runs too!

I have to shotgun the question, you understand.

Two screws on the bottom, remove the motor cover. Two more remove it from the switch, and try not to loose the nut that falls out.

Read up and post a picture on any questions.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you for the info. The insulating pins are on the inside rail as you suggest. I will need to check out the wiring diagrams and open up the switches and get back to you on my findings.
 

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Classic problem with the 022. You need to overhaul the switch. Basically, that's going to consist of taking the bottom cover off the switch, cleaning up the crimped track bus bars and the soldered connection (which breaks 80% of the time) and then soldering all of these connections for good contact. Make sure you also include the copper strap on the incoming side of the switch and clean it as well, it provides the ground to the switch motor. The contacts for the motor will probably have to be cleaned and adjusted as well. Of course, oiling the moving parts (but NOT the motor solenoid) will help a great deal. The switch should move very freely when you rotate the lantern holder or it won't work under power. Finally, the mousetrap that keeps it from moving without power may need adjustment.

If the switch is still totally dead, there's one more area I've discovered that is a problem. The pin you're inserting the fixed voltage plug to sometimes has poor or no continuity to the connection, you may have to solder the base to the lug that has the wired connection.

I've purchased about 50 of these old switches, and I've discovered that it's pointless to spend more money for a "clean" one. I figure they'll all need the same overhaul, takes the guesswork out of buying them. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I have a fundamental question that may explain some of my problems. This question comes to mind as I started to read T-Man's switch repair thread. Is there a correct way to wire the lockon to the 1033 transformer? I have two lockons for my track, and I'm wondering if they are backward from one another. I see terminal 1 goes to the center rail. Which terminal of the transformer should the center rail get connected to? Might as well make sure the foundation of my layout is correct before I start opening up switches that were serviced and do look like they are in good shape and moving smoothly.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Connect the center rail to U on the 1033.

Obviously, all should be wired the same! :)
'Obviously', but not when you, your 6 year old, and your 3 year old are excited to get the trains running, and you've never had more than one lockon connected to your track! :)

That was one problem... not connected correctly and possibly backwards from one to the other, and I think that's why the train was getting voltage when I was operating the switch controller.

The switches both operate smoothly. The far switch has something wrong with the fixed voltage booster pin when just using variable track voltage. I have to wedge it over away from the track to get the lights to work and the controller to switch the track properly using variable track voltage.

However, now with the lockons connected properly to the transformer, I hooked up the fixed voltage pins to the side of the switches, and all is right in the world! Everything works great! Time to get some more switches to make the layout more interesting.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
If the flexible contact is not formed correctly, 022's will not work properly on track voltage, but the fixed voltage will work. In any case, fixed voltage is a far better option for running your switches.
Yeah, it really works well now that I have the track and transformer hooked up correctly! Thanks once again to everyone here for your help. My kids and I really appreciate it.
 

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You can find a good discussion I posted on www.trains.com of how to rejuvinate the 022 switches. I did about 80 of them, and I think I found all the problems. Search for 022/711 switch operating pblms.

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Yeah, 50 is a good start. Did you post the fixes you found? I put a diode in series with the lamp to reduce the power dissipation. I run the switches on the 20 volt fixed voltage tap on a KW, and the 18 volt lamps were melting the lanterns. The diode reduces the voltage enough that the lamps run cool enough you can touch them, and the lower brightness looks more real to my eye.
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I have 86 022 switches. I bought most of them for $4-7.50 each. I bought a few that were "new in the box" for about $20 ea. All of them needed restoration. The NIB switches had some of the same problems with bad crimped connections that the old dogs had. Read my post on www.trains.com.
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Yeah, 50 is a good start. Did you post the fixes you found? I put a diode in series with the lamp to reduce the power dissipation. I run the switches on the 20 volt fixed voltage tap on a KW, and the 18 volt lamps were melting the lanterns. The diode reduces the voltage enough that the lamps run cool enough you can touch them, and the lower brightness looks more real to my eye.
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The diode sounds like a good idea, I'm running them on 14V and they seem fine and don't get that hot.
 
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