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Introducing the newest addition to our Cripple Creek Collection!


The Cripple Creek Engine Works from Menards Shop Now>

Dimensions: 19”W x 11-7/8”D x 10”H

The Cripple Creek Engine Works is a locomotive shop designed in a classic steam era style. The building is an elegant wood structure that combines style and functionality. The shop has a run-through stall and a dead-end stall to let you service either locomotives and rolling stock.

The Basics: This is a completely assembled and detailed structure. The base has grass and shrubs around the building. Add-on details include two workers, pallets, a trash can, and hand truck. The structure is 19 inches wide, 11-7/8 inches deep, and 10 inches high. There are nearly 90 prewired LEDs to brighten the scene. The building is designed for use with the Menards Plug & Play 4.5-volt power supply, sold separately.

Check Menards SKUs 279-4061, 279-4062, or 279-4050. You may wish to consider the 8- or 9-piece Plug & Play accessory kits (SKU# 279-4035, 4681) and to serve multiple structures and vehicles. All are available separately.

Why you need this: Simply put, it looks cool and is a realistic addition to your railroad. The building has a gray heavy stone base. The siding is a cream color and the roof is tar shingle black. In the middle of the roof is a riser with more siding and black shingles. There are two flashing red lights on top of it.

You can run an engine through the rear of the building and you can dead-end a locomotive through the left side. The engine doorways are roughly 6 inches tall and can accommodate both traditional and scale-size O gauge equipment.

The structure’s workspace is also realistic. Your O scale shop workers could function in it even without electric light. The front and rear walls have four tall windows with 35 panes each. The top two rows of each have open transoms. The roof has six 48-pane skylights, and the right side has its own 35-pane window. Last, but not least, there are front and rear double doors with transoms above each.

Why is this a great feature? Put a locomotive or freight car inside and it will be easy to spot, not hidden away. This adds a little extra flair to you train scene.

The most interesting design element is fairly subtle. Each end of the building has a round 8-pane window just below the roof. The design suggests a steam locomotive drive wheel. This design is duplicated on two interior roof supports as well. The locomotive entries also have subtle weathering where the paint is obscured by decades of diesel or steam engine exhaust.

If your railroad has not included a servicing building thus far, now is the time to make room for it. The Cripple Creek Engine Works has a classic design, but works well for steam or diesel powered model railroads.
 

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Really nice building that I think will appeal to those on both the toy train side and the realism side. And once again, small foot print. I will be getting one.

BTW -- might want to change the date in your post title.
 

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I agree that the building itself is nice looking but instead of Menard's hitting a "home run", for me at least it's a "fly out" by having NO SIDE DOORS on the openings where the engines enter. :) That's not prototypical and with those arch shaped openings it's unlikely anyone makes doors that will fit those openings! Come on Menard's, would adding doors have added that much to the building's cost to justify not including them? I also never saw the interior of an engine house so bare bones and void of tools and associated equipment either.
However, if it had doors, it would look good on a layout situated in close proximity to Menard's burned out engine house. :)

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