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Discussion Starter #1
I've finished my track plan using the SCARM software. I printed it in 1:1 scale, taped all of the pieces together and placed the 4x8 paper template on my layout table. What is the best way to transfer this paper plan to the plywood bench so I can accurately place the track roadbed?? What are some methods that are used? I can't think of a good way to do it. :confused: HELP!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I would like to use foam roadbed, so it will have to be glued down to the plywood table. I really need a way to "transfer" the paper template plan to the plywood. Hmmmmm..
 

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I found easier to just draw the 1:1 plan directly on the sub-roadbed.
 

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ponce wheels and chaulk

I would like to use foam roadbed, so it will have to be glued down to the plywood table. I really need a way to "transfer" the paper template plan to the plywood. Hmmmmm..


Firemist;

There is a tool called a ponce wheel that dressmakers use to transfer paper patterns onto fabric. I think it would do what you want. A ponce wheel looks like the "rawl" spiked wheel on a cowboy's spurs, only smaller, and with a handle. Micro Mark www.micromark.com is one source, or you might try a fabric store.

After securely taping, pining, or stapling, your track plan to the plywood, you would use the ponce wheel like a pen to trace along the track centerlines on your plan. You will need to press down fairly hard. The points of the wheel will poke through the paper plan and into the plywood. You can make the plan's image on the plywood show up better if you trace the centerlines again, this time with a piece of chalk, a pen, or a pencil. Some of the chalk, ink, or pencil lead, will go through the holes and onto the plywood. This will be easier to see than the faint holes made by the ponce wheel. You could then remove the track plan, and connect the dots on the plywood to reproduce your plan.

Another, simpler, method just occurred to me, Carbon Paper. An Office Depot, or Staples, store may stock carbon paper. You would need a box of it, and a roll of Scotch tape. Tape the carbon paper sheets together, all facing the same dull side down. Into a 4' x 2' or 4'x4' giant sheet. I think a 4' x 8' sheet of carbon paper would be too hard to handle. Put the big carbon paper between your track plan and the plywood, with the flat dull side of the carbon paper facing down against the plywood. Then trace with a ballpoint pen, or a pencil, along the track centerlines. The carbon paper will duplicate your tracing onto the plywood. Move the carbon sheet to the next area of the track plan/plywood sandwich and trace the rest of your plan.

Or, you could just glue the plan permanently onto the plywood, and glue your roadbed and the rest of your layout to the track plan. This would require a good strong glue bond to keep your plan, and everything else, in place permanently. This is possible, but maybe a bit impractical.

Bye the way, I think this whole procedure may be overkill. Most of us just locate the track on the plywood by measurement, or actually lay the track pieces on the plywood and trace, or spray paint, (good opportunity to weather your track ;)) The track's outline onto the plywood. Still, it's your railroad, and you did go to all the trouble of printing out a 1:1 copy of your track plan.

good luck;

Traction Fan :smilie_daumenpos:
 

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Why do you need to transfer it??
I can't use SCARM, or any other app, because I don't have a PC or a laptop.
But I was under the impression that it was only meant to let you see how your plan looks, and how it fits... not for 'transferring' it to a surface.
Many layouts are built with risers and runners -- not on flat plywood or Homosote... in which case 'transferring' would be impossible.
IMO, this is just a bunch of over-think.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Traction Fan... I like the idea of assembling the track on the bench and then weathering (spray painting) it to transfer the design to the plywood. HOWEVER.... And this is to reply to LateStarter too, the plan contains a lot of flex track. I would not know where to cut the flex track or bend it to fit the plan if the plan was not under the track. So, I will combine the two ideas... I will use transfer paper and the tracing wheel to get the plan on the plywood, then lay the track on the tracing, paint it remove the track, then lay the roadbed.... TA-DA! Lots of work but hey, I'm retired and have all day :). Thanks for your answers and help....
 

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Remember the old typewriter carbon paper? I put that under a printed sheet and traced the required lines onto the plywood. The real trick these days is finding someone who still carries carbon paper, or even knows what it is!
 

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Maybe I'm one of the few members old enough to
remember CARBON PAPER. Typists placed it between
two sheets of paper in the typewriter. You got the
original plus the 'carbon copy'. (that's where the
term originated).

You want to transfer your printout to the layout
top. Place the carbon between your print and
the plywood. Use a ball point pen to trace the image.
The carbon will transfer the image to the plywood.

Maybe one of the office supply stores might carry it
still.

Don
 

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I'll be laying track on Homosote, on risers, and on construction foam... based on a plan laid out on a roll of drafting paper, from a drawing board, and taped to the wall.
Except for a 'front-and-center' terminal and a 3-track yard, there is a scant amount of flat terrain anywhere, so neighborhoods, roads, industrial sites, and roadbed are largely 'carved' (as in 'blasted') out of the Southwestern landscape.
Mountain-slopes, hills, valleys, gulches, and river beds.
No carbon paper.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hi Guys! I found the carbon paper at Hobby Lobby in the art department. The lady who helped me wasn't sure what "carbon" paper was. When I told her what I was doing with it she said "Oh, you mean "transfer" paper"! :laugh:... So there ya go. I bought a package of transfer paper ($4.00), and a tracing wheel (2.00) while I was there and tested the idea. It worked perfectly. BTW, they had white transfer paper there too! Thanks again to all... JOHN
 

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.... the plan contains a lot of flex track. I would not know where to cut the flex track or bend it to fit the plan if the plan was not under the track. So, I will combine the two ideas... I will use transfer paper and the tracing wheel to get the plan on the plywood, then lay the track on the tracing, ....
Be prepared for surprises. In SCARM (ATLAS), when you bend flex track, it magically aligns, both rails with sectional track.

In real life, when you bend 36" flex track, one rail gets shorter than the other, so you need to cut the longer rail to match. Now the end of the flex track will not match your 1:1 printout, unless you already cut the flex shorter than 36" in the plan.
 

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Actually, you DON'T need to lay your track down in a micrometrically exact replication of the paper plan. As long as your track joints are well aligned, your curves are smooth (and are at least equal to your minimum radius), and your track work is free from kinks, "close enough" works just fine. Pull up one sheet of paper at a time, and transfer the track centerline to your surface using a trammel and straight edge. Check your plan and make any adjustments now. Then lay the roadbed by splitting it down the middle (commercial stuff is pre-split for just this reason) and gluing one half right up to the centerline. Repeat for the other half. Then lay your track on top. And yes, it is much easier to assemble larger chunks at the workbench and install those. You can use your paper templates to build those assemblies, too.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks again Dennis and CTVRR. This forum is great! I will take care when using the flex track to be sure the ends align without any kinks. I wasn't aware that the track does not have to match the plan exactly!. But I agree... close enough will be ok and less stressful.
 
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