Model Train Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I bought some 1689W tenders for the kids. One just hums, so I'll figure that out later. The other, has the whistle constantly on.
I have a RW 110 transformer and at WOT, I get 19.05 VAC and with the whistle button down, a little bit over 25 VAC. I also checked the DC voltage, but it was in the mV area and fluctuating, either in WOT or whistle. So, I'm going to take a leap of faith and say that the problem is not with my RW. (A & U Lugs).
Before I bend (and break) the tabs on the tender body, what should I be looking for? I don't have any other transformers available, but maybe soon. Is there a possibility that there is a relay stuck in the tender? I am currently at a loss.
TIA - Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Never mind.
I was bench testing with the tenders upside down. I guess there is a gravity switch (similar to the E-Unit) that makes contact when the tender is on it's back.
The whistles are still a little wonky when placed upright, but now I think I know how to proceed.
Thanks for putting up with me.
 

·
Railroad Tycoon
Joined
·
23,725 Posts
Never mind.
I was bench testing with the tenders upside down. I guess there is a gravity switch (similar to the E-Unit) that makes contact when the tender is on it's back.
The whistles are still a little wonky when placed upright, but now I think I know how to proceed.
Thanks for putting up with me.
Most everyone has done something like that before......
welcome to the club, :)
 

·
Railroad Tycoon
Joined
·
23,725 Posts
Take it apart and check it out, you would be surprised at some of the things that make their way inside of it.
This one had dead microscopic black hornets. Tiny they were. (Tender #2046w)
Look at the whistle chamber, I was wondering why it didn't whistle.
It was solid mud. :D

P4190002.jpg


That is in this thread, https://www.modeltrainforum.com/showthread.php?t=11948
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I didn't have any mud wasps in mine, but when I finally figured out how to properly bench test one, I got the "pebbles in a can" sound that somebody else mentioned on another thread. Then, the motor just stopped and hummed.
I took the whistle motor apart to lubricate it with a drop or two of oil, put it back together and all it did was hum and the smoke started to escape from the armature. I cleaned up the armature contact areas with a Dremel brush, put it back together again. The armature seems to spin freely without any power, but when I apply voltage to the brush cans, it still just hums and the armature gets hot.
I haven't installed new brushes yet. Would that be the issue? I did try to cleanup the old brushes with some emery cloth. Maybe my armature is toast or the field has a short? I don't know how properly to test it with a multi meter. Maybe someone can direct me with troubleshooting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
According to the pdf that Doc pointed me to, all tests, but one, passed. The only question I have is a Grounded Field Coil good or bad?

"Connect on 6-volt lead to point (3), Figure 2, and touch the other lead to the field laminations. If the field winding is grounded there will be a spark. When a field is discovered to be defective, the best procedure is to replace the entire whistle unit.". Paragraph "e." second page.

I used a multi-meter instead of a live circuit, and I get resistance between point (3) and the field laminations. Meaning, the circuit is not open and the field is grounded. Is this okay?

I have attached the pdf files that I am referring to.
View attachment 001256.pdf

View attachment 001257.pdf
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,771 Posts
Don't quite understand how your testing it. The whistle relay grounds the field windings to make the whistle blow. Whistle motor is a series wound motor - armature and field must be powered in series to make the motor run. Normally one brush is always connected to the field, constant power is applied to the other brush and the field is grounded (circuit completed) when the whistle relay is energized. This last feat(whistle relay) is accomplished when a dc signal is added to the AC. The whistle itself runs on track AC (series wound motor).

If you power the whistle directly (one lead to the brush connected to the center pickup and the other lead connected to the field at the relay connection) it should blow. Most common problem is dirty cummutator or brushes.

One way to make the whistle blow w/ the relay is to power your track center rail in series with a D battery. This will supply enough DC signal to operate the relay.

Do not apply juice across the two brushes! This will smoke (destroy) the armature.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top