Model Train Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, newcomer here looking for advice. I have recently entered the sport of model trains and am building my track but have issues and questions that I’m sure the knowledge here will help with.

I am using dc method and am trying to have 2 tracks with 2 trains that can switch between tracks. I have 2 controllers and 2 powered track connectors. Below is a general design of my desired setup.

I looking for advice on power, shorting and setting up blocks to make my design work with 2 loco and 2 cabs (if it can even happen)

Look forward to the specialist advice.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,444 Posts
you will need to put insulators [or gapped rail] at each end of the twp double switches ... four sets [of two each] insulators ..
and then add switches [two dpdt] to set the switches to either cab unit
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
890 Posts
I hate to be 'that guy' who says 'why don't you just do this', so before I say it I'll ask if you already have the locos?

If you don't have the locos yet, then you may want to consider doing DCC. It will make it easier and perhaps more pleasant in the future. Unless you're an old schooler and just want to run DC, in which case go for it.

You also may want to download some track planning software like scarm, anyrail, or rr-tracks. They're usually free to use with fewer than X pieces of track (75-100 pieces, or whatever).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,765 Posts
Switch relocation?

Hi all, newcomer here looking for advice. I have recently entered the sport of model trains and am building my track but have issues and questions that I’m sure the knowledge here will help with.

I am using dc method and am trying to have 2 tracks with 2 trains that can switch between tracks. I have 2 controllers and 2 powered track connectors. Below is a general design of my desired setup.

I looking for advice on power, shorting and setting up blocks to make my design work with 2 loco and 2 cabs (if it can even happen)

Look forward to the specialist advice.
Wenchbags;

The short answer is the first part of the one already given by wvgca, about the insulated rail joiners. For right now, I recommend you skip the second part of his reply concerning the two DPDT switches. For now, you can just use the direction switches on your two power packs.
So, as wvgca says, you will need to put insulated rail joiners in both rails where each switch connects to another switch to form what is called a "crossover." You call it a "double switch" but don't sweat the terminology, we know what you mean. ;) Using these insulated rail joiners, you should be able to control one train on each loop independently. Connect one of your DC power packs to each loop, using one of the terminal track sections you have.

When a train crosses from one loop to the other, it will come under the control of the power pack that controls that other loop. If there is already another train on that same loop, then you will no longer have independent control. Both trains will be controlled by the one power pack connected to that loop.
Also, for a train to get through a crossover at all, both power packs must have their direction switches set for the same direction of travel. If they are not, then you will get a short circuit when the locomotive gets to the middle of the crossover.

You mentioned "blocks" and controlling two trains, independently, when both are on the same loop. There is a system for doing that with DC. It's called "Dual cab control." It involves a lot of wiring, track runs long enough to hold two complete trains, and the construction of a control panel. As Tom_C suggested, it would be a lot simpler to do this using DCC instead of DC, but it's your choice.

On your "New Member Introduction" post, I responded with a bunch of files that explain many things about model railroading, including both DC "Dual cab control," and DCC control. Section 6 of the "How to build a better first layout" series has an explanation of how each of these two control systems work. For convenience, I've attached copies of those file below as well. Also, there is a good book titled, Wiring Your Model Railroad" by Larry Puckett, available at https://kalmbachhobbystore.com/products/books

Finally, your track plan sketch shows both crossovers ("double switches") located on curves. Things will run a lot more smoothly, with fewer derailments, if you move both your crossovers to areas with two parallel straight tracks, instead of curves.

good luck, and have fun!

Traction Fan :smilie_daumenpos:

View attachment WHERE DO I START rev 4.pdf

View attachment 1 How to build a better first layout.pdf

View attachment 2 How to build a better first layout.pdf

View attachment 3 & 4 How to build a better first layout.pdf

View attachment 5 How to build a better first layout.pdf

View attachment 6 How to build a better first layout.pdf

View attachment All AboutTurnouts rev 5.pdf

View attachment Model Railroad Terminology 3.pdf

View attachment MODEL RAILROADING ON A BUDGET.pdf
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,202 Posts
minimalist

I would put gaps at the white circles.
Outer train running, power pack 1
Inner train running, power pack 2

To swap,
Park inner train in block B
Turn off block B
Throw electrical switch to connect block A to block D (outer)
Send outer Train to block A
Turn off block A
Throw electrical switch to connect block B to block D (outer)
Send inner Train to block D
realign all to normal

This is a minimal approach using DC and block control.
You could combine block C to A or B for more simplification.
or
Cut the outer loop into more blocks
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,466 Posts
I agree with Dennis suggestions to wire your
layout of 2 ovals connected by turnouts that
create a double crossover for DC.

But, it is such a pain to create all those isolated
sections, each connected by wires to a panel with the associated
switches. You also need 2 power packs.

Then, to run trains, you have to jockey your
trains from one iso section to another, flip this and that switch
as you work the speed and reverse controls.

All that is the argument to go DCC. You would need
maybe 4 track feeds from ONE bus. No isolated
sections. No panel of switches, no rats nest of wires.
And train operation is less awkward and more fun.
One controller will run two or more trains at the
same time with ease.

Don
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top