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Discussion Starter #1
The whole bridge weighs less than 30 #'s for ease of handling, and consists of 6 sections, four 4', and two 2' ends.
It was made for use as a display bridge for Jeb Kriigel of JT's MegaSteam Smoke Fluid. It will be heading to York this fall. Look for it there.

13 Arch at Greenberg Show.jpg

20footUnderarches.jpg

Spandrels and stringcourse 20 footer.jpg

getting ready for the show.jpg
 

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Interesting, I have almost the same color table covers for my tables in the Blue hall at York. Table E-57, 56, and 55, stop and say hello. I assume you will be in the Black hall, I'll try to get up to see it, but I will be alone at my tables and it's hard to get away.
 

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That is a true work of art. The detailing is marvelous. Amazing. Would you mind sharing some of your materials and process? Have you ever done a building post on this? I would like to learn more. Thanks.
 

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I love Tim’s work and I used to follow it over on OGR. It has inspired me to make stonework more realistic and less like Mr. Rodgers neighborhood. I saw his display at York, but no one was around the display when I was there.

Wood – He uses rigid foam and does a lot of carving.

Bob
 

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Thanks Bob, I guess he posted this to encourage members to visit him at York. Hope he adds some more info here.
 

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Wow, how was this made to weigh only thirty pounds? I'm fascinated by miniature architecture; someone of my acquaintance has been carving gothic churches and castles out of insulation foam.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Thanks everyone for your kind comments and encouragement. It has been a long road for me doing this, but I love doing it. I have tried many techniques over the years, and the various bridges that I have made reflect this.
At times I got a little too fancy for my britches, and tried to over think things, and then went back to basics, and got a better result.

I am trying to earn a living at this, so forgive me if I can't answer all questions in a detailed sense, but I will say that my favorite building foams are the pink and blue, I do not care much for the green. They are all similar, but they cooperate differently when embossing.

I begin by cutting them into strips on my radial arm saw as if they are a sheet of plywood. From there, I place them into various forms that I have already made for the size and style of bridge itself. From there I glue them up in layers, and eventually use my large, harp shaped hot wire tool to cut the arch barrels.

I make the underarches and voissoirs and keystones as a separate sub-project, again, radial arm saw. Safest saw to use, never try cutting foam with a table saw, way too dangerous.

I carve the stones and use various techniques that I have developed in order to add texture to the block.

I make the piers as a separate sub-project, again, radial arm saw.

I like to add a deck, although depending upon the distance between the keystones and the string course (top course), the bridge doesn't necessarily need one. I choose either wood or cement board, and cut them on either my radial arm, or my wet tile saw, respectively.
The 13 arch, 20' long bridge mentioned without the deck, weighs an incredible four pounds, and will support the weight of any O gauge model train, no problem.

I simply like a add a deck to separate the foam from the track wiring in case of a hot spot, and also to give the customer something to fasten his track to if he desires to do so.
Cement board is amazing, as it really looks like concrete, just as it is, I rarely paint it other than to add some light weathering.
Prime and paint the bridge when ready, with acrylics only, but I have also used oil pastels over a good acrylic base for tremendous effect, with no interaction with the foam.
So, that's about it, many, many steps, many hours, lots of space and tools, technique, and dust. But in the end, something to be proud of.

One more thing, I have a new website with additional information about my passion for making these types of bridges, it can be found at:

www.archbridgeman.com
 

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I can understand why you don't like to use a table saw. The foam doesn't move when you use a radial and isn't likely to get misaligned with the blade. I do use a table saw to cut foam, but I've learned to use an old blade and to keep the foam perfectly in line with the blade. Once in a while if the foam gets a little out of line, it melts foam onto the blade and/or sends it flying across the room.
 

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Tim, in advanced messaging:

1. Copy the link with your mouse from a separate webpage.

2. Go back to your message. Click on the message like your are going to type something.

3. Go to the blue globe with the paperclip at the bottom of the globe and click it. A window will come up, then click on the link next to the highlighted http://. Do not delete the highlighted portion. Right click your mouse and past the link then press OK.

Practice makes perfect.
 
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