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Yard Master & Research
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Here is a simple four wheel tender I found last train show. I thought they were somewhat common. After all four wheel cars exist as boxcars tankers and even tenders. This model had no number stamp so what is it. After a failure at Tandem Lionel ID page, and an image search. I went to my CD with old Lionel Catalogs and searched 1940, nope, 1939, never, 1938, a good year but not for four wheels.1937! Oh come on!. Then the AHHA moment, 1936 Four Sets on page 46 matched up with engine 1511 the Commodore Vanderbilt.

Unfortunately there is no whistle. The ends have no Journal boxes.



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Premium Member
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Very nice find, T-Man. Not too common. In that 1936 catalog, it looks like a slightly different 4-wheel tender came with the 1588 windup streamliner, here including journals on the axle ends.

TJ
 

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Yard Master & Research
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Discussion Starter #3
Two wheels are not original. Looking at the bottom on the right end, they are large! Larger than the 800 series cars. The 800 series size match the size on the left.
 

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I've tried to shy away from the dual-purpose (primer and paint in one) spray paints -- Krylon, etc., and use only traditional / separate primer then paint, instead. That said, perhaps this is just old-school thinking on my part, with no technical justification to poo-poo the new dual stuff.

Do you, T, or anyone have any tangible critique on the use and long term protection of the newer dual paints (used without traditional primer)?

Cheers,

TJ
 

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I sandblast. So the tinplate surface is more or less pristine to accept paint. Than I use Rustoleum Rattle can. Never had a problem. But I don;t really have any long term data to report. Of course, the paint is somewhat soft until it cures: hour(s) if baked, a week if at room temp.

Can you refresh my memory on baking: 150 F for 30 min.'s?
 

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I've tried to shy away from the dual-purpose (primer and paint in one) spray paints -- Krylon, etc., and use only traditional / separate primer then paint, instead. That said, perhaps this is just old-school thinking on my part, with no technical justification to poo-poo the new dual stuff.

Do you, T, or anyone have any tangible critique on the use and long term protection of the newer dual paints (used without traditional primer)?

Cheers,

TJ
I'm with you TJ, old school. It seems more like a marketing ploy than actually working properly, similar to those "rust away" sprays for automobiles and etc.
I have had very good luck with the filler-primer rattle cans. Maybe it is just self serving on my part, but that primer seems to cover all, or most, of the little imperfections that you could see with a very good photo.
Since I haven't used any of those products, I'll stand by and wait for someone who has and their response (following).
Just my $.02.
 

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Yard Master & Research
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10,693 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I think dual purpose is a thick paint. I like a nice cheep style thin paint for painting. I miss the old Walmart colors the cream yellow and burnt orange. Hopefully a normal primer will always be available. It just wasn't a that store that day.
 
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