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Discussion Starter #1
First off- what is the definition of a mushroom layout? To those I have asked, they answered by showing a photo

or 2 of what looks like a shelf layout, one mounted on a wall at a certain elevation, and then one above it mounted on

the same wall and with less depth than the lower one. Is that what is being referred to as mushroom?

I have a limited space so am researching this. My concern is reaching and working on this setup. Maybe as the raw,

uneducated, unrefined rookie that I am, I should keep it simple and just throw up one shelf and call it a day. My space

is roughly 14ft x 2 or 3 feet, and 7 foot vertically.
 

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"..
I should keep it simple and just throw up one shelf and call it a day. My space

is roughly 14ft x 2 or 3 feet, and 7 foot vertically.
"

Yes, more than enough space.
 

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Railroad Tycoon
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Multiple levels, it is not just a shelf and then another. Though it could be for a switching layout.
2 pictures.

545472
545473
 

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First off- what is the definition of a mushroom layout? To those I have asked, they answered by showing a photo

or 2 of what looks like a shelf layout, one mounted on a wall at a certain elevation, and then one above it mounted on

the same wall and with less depth than the lower one. Is that what is being referred to as mushroom?

I have a limited space so am researching this. My concern is reaching and working on this setup. Maybe as the raw,

uneducated, unrefined rookie that I am, I should keep it simple and just throw up one shelf and call it a day. My space

is roughly 14ft x 2 or 3 feet, and 7 foot vertically.
spacomp;

The term "mushroom" (in the context of a model railroad design) was coined by master track planer John Armstrong. He designed a double sided, multi-shelf, layout with the shelves on either side of each aisle at different, interlaced, or alternating, elevations.

The purpose of Armstrong's "mushroom" design was to get more model railroad into a given room space, with more of it at a convenient eye level. He used different "floor" heights to do this. There were wooden platforms built up above the real floor to allow an operator to see the level that his train was traveling through.
Why "mushroom?" Because, when viewed from the end, this entire layout vaguely resembled the shape of a mushroom.

Model Railroader Magazine published articles on the original Armstrong "mushroom" concept. You should be able to get more information from them. The idea was a bit hard for me to understand fully when I first read the article. Since Armstrong was a genius at track planning, and the revolutionary "mushroom" was one of his most complex designs, I feel no shame for my lack of total understanding. The original article featured drawings of the mushroom, and that's probably a better "definition" than I can provide.

Traction Fan
 

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Discussion Starter #5
on my mind is how high should I place a shelf for ideal viewing if there is one shelf? two shelves? Would the NMRA 'regulations' for modular layouts represent the perfect viewing elevation

if only one shelf? I figure NMRA calculated the range of elevations of an eyeball from the floor, and went with some compromised average viewing height. Should I just follow that if only one shelf?
 
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