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Mike, in looking over your wiring diagram for the bridge, second diagram, you have the bridge inputs wired to the NC contacts. Shouldn't they be wired to the NO contacts ?
You know, you have a point and that won't work either. My apologies. I've been cranking this out while attending to various chores today - not thinking it through. It will work, just needs adaption to the bridge.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
You know, you have a point and that won't work either. My apologies. I've been cranking this out while attending to various chores today - not thinking it through. It will work, just needs adaption to the bridge.
No apologies needed. I appreciate your help.
 

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I haven't looked at the bridge wiring ... I presume the insulated track's ground connection will raise the bridge. But will the bridge continue to raise to it's fully open position if the ground connection is broken before it finishes? Or is only the manual button able to momentarily trigger and initiate the bridge's full open or close cycle?
 

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Discussion Starter #24
I haven't looked at the bridge wiring ... I presume the insulated track's ground connection will raise the bridge. But will the bridge continue to raise to it's fully open position if the ground connection is broken before it finishes? Or is only the manual button able to momentarily trigger and initiate the bridge's full open or close cycle?
The activation button only needs to be pushed for about a second or two. Once it's pushed, the bridge will rise then stop in the raised position until the button is pushed again. And vice versa for going down.

If I take the two wires that go to the activation button and touch one to an outside rail and the other to the insulated rail, then pass a car over the insulated track section, the bridge goes the same scenario.

If the car stays on the insulated section, the bridge will continue to raise, lower, raise, etc, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
In my never ending quest to keep things simple, I had this thought. Do you think it would work ? Would the DC voltage interfere with the operation of a train or vise versa.

IMG_2875.jpg
 

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Operation: The bridge is hard wired to accessory or track power on one input. When the train connects the insulated track, that connection to ground passes through the normally closed position on the relay to the bridge's other input. The bridge begins it's timer cycle. Similarly, the delay module also powers up with the insulated rail's connection to ground.. After the delay expires, the relay is tripped to the normally open position. This breaks the connection to ground to the bridge and it will end it's cycle at the full up position on it's own. When the train leaves the insulated rail, the modules will lose power and reset for the next cycle.

This will work. But I strongly suggest you feed it from 16 to 18 V accessory power to insure enough voltage for consistent operation. You can continue to use track power for the bridge or the same accessory power that powers the module. Either will be one wire to the "switch" input. The other wire to the switch input coming from the diagram. And you can also connect the trailing insulated rail wire to the leading insulated rail wire. The module will cycle the bridge for either.

554923
 

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In my never ending quest to keep things simple, I had this thought. Do you think it would work ? Would the DC voltage interfere with the operation of a train or vise versa.

View attachment 554924
Aside from the extra power supply ... when the train connects the insulated rail, the time waits before tripping the relay. And the relay will stay tripped as long as the train is on the insulated rail. You've added a delay before the bridge cycles and it will continue to cycle as long as the train is on the insulated rail.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Aside from the extra power supply ... when the train connects the insulated rail, the time waits before tripping the relay. And the relay will stay tripped as long as the train is on the insulated rail. You've added a delay before the bridge cycles and it will continue to cycle as long as the train is on the insulated rail.

Good point Mike. That's why I posted the diagram. Two heads are better than one. Thank you, by the way for your last post, explaining in easy to understand terms, the wiring and sequence description of the operation.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Good point Mike. That's why I posted the diagram. Two heads are better than one. Thank you, by the way for your last post, explaining in easy to understand terms, the wiring and sequence description of the operation.
Please tell me again what the R510 and 10uF parts are and what I should ask for.
 

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Please tell me again what the R510 and 10uF parts are and what I should ask for.
The resistor: When the modules lose power (train off the insulated rail), there's enough energy in their onboard capacitors to keep the timer electronics powered for a while but not enough to hold the relay in the triggered position. So the relay resets quickly but not the electronics. The resistor bleads that energy quickly so the electronics reset in a timely fashion.

The capacitor: The extra capacitor provides some energy holdover. This keeps everything powered up when the train momentarily loses contact with the insulated rail. That is, a train connects the insulated rail but can momentarily lose contact especially if it's bouncing around the track.

What to ask for: "Mike do you have any of this 10 cent parts in your spare parts bin?" PM me your address (forum start a conversation from my avatar).
 
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