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Interesting that the roundtable lead tracks do not pass through the turntable and straight into the roundhouse.
 

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Interesting that the roundtable lead tracks do not pass through the turntable and straight into the roundhouse.
Eh, not that interesting. That would only line up to one of the 17 stalls so the majority of the time the table has to turn to get at any stall anyways. (And actually the one lead does run right into the last stall.)
 

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At 5:07 in the video we see locomotive 1034 behind the roundhouse. Is it being used for something, or is it abandoned?

I see some automobiles parked in various places, so obviously not all of the buildings are abandoned, right?

Pictures like these just make me sad. I realize RRs modernize and things change, but to see those facilities (roundhouse, turntable, transfer table, etc.) just sitting there decaying is heartbreaking! :(

You're really quite good with the drone. I appreciate your videos and descriptions...thank you!
 

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About a half-mile from the roundhouse site is a museum display that features one of the Union RR's massive 0-10-2 switchers. These locos were shipped off to the the DM&IR when the Union began dieselizing. One was saved and brought to Greenville, and it is painted Union on one side and DM&IR on the other. For background, the B&LE connected with the Union RR near Monroeville, PA. The Union handled interplant movements in the Mon Valley, while the B&LE did the line hauls up to Lake Erie.
 

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New question

I am building a turntable module for my shelf layout.
(Photo is a mockup using brass sectional track, final will be NS code 83)
I wonder, if an engine was inside with no steam or coal.
And, the stall does not line up with a through track.

How would it be pulled out of the stall onto the table?

I've started reading online articles, but thought this thread might be a good place to ask.
 

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Sometimes larger engine facilities would have a small tank locomotive they would use to move dead engines in and out of the roundhouse.

Steam engines, destined for shop work would often drop their fire on the ash pit but have more than enough steam to make it into the roundhouse. If they were outbound, the hostler would build a fire in the engine inside the roundhouse and move the engine when the steam pressure built up.

I would guess there many different techniques for handling dead engines, depending on the railroad...

Tom
 
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