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Railroad Tycoon
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Discussion Starter #1
What do YOU use to filter the water out of the air.
We have threads on air brushing.
I found a couple of air brush guns I am going to try and was looking at filters to add to my compressor.
I don't really rely on reviews, but a lot of negative reviews turn me off to purchasing a product.

I see in line filters, filters to mount on your compressor, and duel filters.
Now with the duel filter one is for lube, you would not want to use a lube for air brushing?
Or can you just turn that one off and just use the water separator filter?

How many use inline filters?

If you fill a portable tank to use instead of a compressor what filter would you use.

Does anyone air brush with no filter?
If you are using a water based paint would a filter even matter?

Tell us your way to make sure there is no water in your air.
 

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water in the air really doesn't make much difference with water based paints . where they don't mix [oil based paint], it can make a difference. you will see streaks in the paint or wash where you have some water in the air ...
i don't run a filter, but the basement air is fairly low humidity, so i don't get water in the paint.
 

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I use this one: 1/4 in. Air Line Filter/ Regulator with Gauge
There are a few negative reviews, but I haven't had any trouble with it. I have it screwed to to the side of my workbench. The hose from the compressor comes in one side, the hose out out the airbrush goes out the other. It's important to remember that the water vapor needs time to cool down and condense. It does that in the hose from the compressor. This is why professional automotive painters have a water trap at the end of the air line, and not just at the compressor. You definitely don't want lube in the air, as you guessed!
Free tip: When setting the regulator, have the trigger on the airbrush depressed. Setting the air pressure this way gives you an accurate reading of what is actually going out the airbrush.
 

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Railroad Tycoon
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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks, everything will have a few negative reviews.
But some are just from idiots.
OK, so far I got the positioning of the filter right.
At the end of the hose is better, that makes sense.
Maybe one coming off the compressor and another one on the bench would be better?
But I think I will be mainly using a water based paint, though that could change.
 

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Railroad Tycoon
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23,512 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I use this one: 1/4 in. Air Line Filter/ Regulator with Gauge
There are a few negative reviews, but I haven't had any trouble with it. I have it screwed to to the side of my workbench. The hose from the compressor comes in one side, the hose out out the airbrush goes out the other. It's important to remember that the water vapor needs time to cool down and condense. It does that in the hose from the compressor. This is why professional automotive painters have a water trap at the end of the air line, and not just at the compressor. You definitely don't want lube in the air, as you guessed!
Free tip: When setting the regulator, have the trigger on the airbrush depressed. Setting the air pressure this way gives you an accurate reading of what is actually going out the airbrush.
Do you have to change the filter inside or just clean it?
Says it is brass, you should just be able to clean it?
 

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It's probably not a filter, but a moisture trap. It works by basically swirling the air around, causing any moisture to precipitate out. You have to empty the reservoir periodically, but there is nothing to clean. If you're sending the air to a tank, you'll want one of these to prevent condensation from corroding your tank. Otherwise, if you're using acrylic paint, there is already a bunch of water in it. For solvent based paint, I'd use one..
 
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Railroad Tycoon
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Discussion Starter #7
It's probably not a filter, but a moisture trap. It works by basically swirling the air around, causing any moisture to precipitate out. You have to empty the reservoir periodically, but there is nothing to clean. If you're sending the air to a tank, you'll want one of these to prevent condensation from corroding your tank. Otherwise, if you're using acrylic paint, there is already a bunch of water in it. For solvent based paint, I'd use one..
OK, thanks
I am on my way, I will experiment with what I have now.
I will use a water base paint for experimentation.
But, I will get a filter. And I think I need a regulator for my little compressor as it took a fall years ago.
But I have a 5 gal portable tank I can use and just fill it up with my big compressor.
I can run an airline from my garage to the basement to fill it so I don't have to carry it up and down all the time.
I can just put in a quick fit fitting through the basement wall if I want.
Or just open the window and feed the air hose down into the basement.
Good thing I didn't go and buy one, as I found 2 I didn't know I had. :giggle:
 
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