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I’m using a Walther’s cement plant model (n scale) to represent the Alpha Portland Cement Co. plant in Jamesville NY. My setting is 1962. I don’t have a lot of prototype reference material built up yet. I was wondering if someone could help with info on the freight service. I’m sure it would be covered hoppers, but I don’t know the best style or manufacturer. Would they be two bay? I haven’t found any NYC rolling stock for sale that looks right to me. Are there some other flagged lines that would be rolling through as well that I could get?

thanks, Dave

ps Here are some pictures of the model. Not yet set in a scene.
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Well, I do know that CP used their large covered hoppers for cement....they painted a white line to depict the level of cement to fill it to.....cement is heavier than typical full grain loads....you can see it on the right end of these cars.....
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Maybe I'm misreading your post Hobo but I would not have thought that hoppers used to ship grain would also be used for cement. My thought was that the cement residue in the car would contaminate the grain.
 

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Maybe I'm misreading your post Hobo but I would not have thought that hoppers used to ship grain would also be used for cement. My thought was that the cement residue in the car would contaminate the grain.
Different cars for different products...dedicated.

I found this info,

copy and paste,
The prototype cars were designed for carrying bulk commodities like powdered minerals and industrial chemicals, including cement and potash. They are 100-tons in capacity with four hopper compartments totaling 3800-3850 cubic feet and are fitted with either round or trough hatches. Examples were built by all three of the major car builders in Canada – Marine Industries, Hawker-Siddeley and National Steel Car – and they have traveled to every corner of Canada and the contiguous United States. Apart from the main carriers such as Canadian National and Canadian Pacific - which together acquired over 4,500 cars between 1965 and 1975 - close to a thousand cars were built for leasing companies, including North American Car Canada NCHX, Canpotex PTEX and Procor UNPX, while CGLX, NAHX, and more recently WREX, later acquired fleets secondhand. Many of these are still in service today.
 

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Maybe I'm misreading your post Hobo but I would not have thought that hoppers used to ship grain would also be used for cement. My thought was that the cement residue in the car would contaminate the grain.
I did not mean to imply that the”same” car was used for both cement and grain....however, the same “type” of car definitely is.....in those types of cars, a hundred tons of grain fills it up, whereas a hundred tons of cement only goes up to that white line.....

And for those who care, the bottom photo that I posted (post #2, CP script), is a model of a 4500 cu ft car, which Intermountain used to represent those cars.....a true 3800 cu ft car (shorter) wasn’t available in plastic model form until Rapido did theirs.....

Intermountain “4550”
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Rapido “3800”
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I did not mean to imply that the”same” car was used for both cement and grain....however, the same “type” of car definitely is.....in those types of cars, a hundred tons of grain fills it up, whereas a hundred tons of cement only goes up to that white line.....
My bad.
 

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Dedicated cement hoppers are shorter than standard ones to compensate for the weight difference.

Remember that just because you model the NYC, that doesn't mean all your rolling stock must be NYC. Railroads transport cars belonging to other roads all the time. In fact probably no more than a third of your cars should be "home road", with most of the rest being from connecting roads and about 10% from "way the heck out there". A few years back, I passed a coal train in Pittsburgh. The 3 locos were Norfolk Southern, CSX and Allegheny. The hoppers were from everywhere, mostly BNSF and UP.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Only a third (happily) surprises me. I've been sticking to NYC until now. Would that apply to rival roads as well? Would NYC move PRR freight?

Dave
 

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Stumpy's right. If a railroad can originate and deliver a cargo on its home rails, it would certainly do so. But if it originates on one road and terminates on another, there is no choice but to transfer the cars (barring a time-consuming and expensive transloading). Intermodal containers might be transferred, but they weren't a thing in the NYC / PRR era. Railroads charge each other a fee for each day one of their cars remains on a foreign road, so it's actually to their benefit to let their cars interchange between the roads.
 
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A look at the ‘55 Guide shows that the Jamesville station was serviced by the Lackawanna. So in ‘62 it would have been the EL after the merger with Erie.
As was previously mentioned, there were probably a number of various roads’ cars present on that line.
How prototypical you want your layout to be is totally up to you. Lots of interesting regional lines in that area back then. Great opportunity for research.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Well right now I’m just glad my trains can go around in a circle without derailing!😉

Im considering it inspired by the NYC and set in NY 1962. I’m hoping to get more prototypical as I get better.
 
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