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Discussion Starter #1
I have a true test for the AF gurus! What fonts are used for the cab numbers on the boiler bodies and the "AMERICAN FLYER" on the tenders? I am hoping this stumps even AmFlyer and mopac!
 

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I do not know what the font is called. I do know that Doug at Portlines can set you up
with a set of dry transfer for your loco based on cab number. It will include cab numbers
and tender graphics. If I were redoing a loco that's where I would get the numbers and
letters. They will be the correct font.
 

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flyernut can give you an idea of cost. I do not believe it is bad. He has relettered
several locos. I am guessing at 8 to 10 bucks. Worth it as it is the finishing touch.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I have already ordered all the dry-transfers for the 302AC from Doug. I was wondering about the font because I was thinking about printing my own decals. I am a little worried about dry transfers since I don't have any experience with them. They look relatively easy but the first time always sucks.

I have vectored the Reading Lines herald so I have the hard part done.

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American Flyer used 2 fonts for the lettering on the engines, Serif and Sans Serif. Serif is the stylized letter whereas Sans Serif if the block style.

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Here are 2 tenders, the first is a 302 AC from 1951.
IMG_0204.JPG

The second is a 302 from 1948.
IMG_0205.JPG

The cab numbers as I remember were all block type, the only exception I can think of is the #1 that was used on certain engines. They usually had a small accent curve at the top, at least all of mine do. One other thing to know is that all 1946 production engines had the railroad name spelled out on the tenders instead of American Flyer of American Flyer Lines.
Hope this is helpful.
 

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And also don't forget, 2 different colors!!! White or silver, get the correct color for a correct restoration...285, 290, 295, and maybe a few more, came with just American Flyer on the tender, no herald.. AmFlyer is the expert here, along with Cramden, they'll know the correct answer.
 

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I don't know if I'm an expert, someone is my household doesn't think so at times! :laugh: Thanks for the reminder flyernut. I forgot about the silver lettering. It was used around 47 to 48 I think. Some engines had silver #s with white letters, others were all silver. Your engine is simple to figure out since the original letters are still visible.
 

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First, any 302AC with the Reading herald on the tender will use white ink for the stampings.
Second, the font used for lettering within the herald on the tender is unique to the Reading trademark. An internet search of Reading Lines history may turn up the name of the font Reading used.
Third, while some items are serif style lettered and some sans-serif that is not the font name. There were multiple fonts used by Gilbert, recall for example some of the sans-serif stamps have a sloped "M" and some have a vertical sided "M". Those are all different fonts. In addition Gilbert varied the kerning when making stamps for some items so the lettering would fit and look right.
I do not know the names of all the fonts Gilbert used but any good printer could identify the fonts.
 

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Hey flyernut. Give him a few hints on how to use the dry transfers. I know you did
on a past post but I could not find it.
 

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Hey flyernut. Give him a few hints on how to use the dry transfers. I know you did
on a past post but I could not find it.
The key is to take your time, and follow the instructions that will come with the transfers.. Make sure you know exactly where you want the transfer, and then lay a piece of matte finish Scotch magic tape over it, and apply to the area. Using a 2b pencil with a dull point, remember those?, rub the pencil over the transfer, completely covering the transfer. When you think you are done, SLOWLY pull up the tape and see how it looks. If part of the transfer hasn't transferred, simply put the transfer back down and re-rub the area that didn't take. That's why you use the scotch tape, to get the transfer back in the exact position.DO NOT LIFT THE ENTIRE PIECE OF SCOTCH TAPE UP, just one corner and proceed to slowly pull up the tape. You'll see where there wasn't a transfer right away, put the tape back down and re-rub.
 
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