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Discussion Starter #1
Ive bought an old Atlas turtable that looks as if it needs some work. Ive heard pretty good things about all the Atlas TTs so im hoping to restore it. Has anyone had any experience w/ this sort of TT?
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Ive bought an old Atlas turtable that looks as if it needs some work. Ive heard pretty good things about all the Atlas TTs so im hoping to restore it. Has anyone had any experience w/ this sort of TT? View attachment 541670 View attachment 541671
USRA Guy;

I owned one of those Atlas turntables many years ago. Here's some pros and cons. On the plus side, the built in indexing is very good. The rails line up well with a piece of track fixed in any of the slots around the perimeter of the turntable. On the good or bad side, depending on the person, is that the gears & cams that line up the rotating track with the others so well, also causes the turntable move in "spurts." The table rotates from track 1 to track 2 and stops. Then, a ;lot of winding of the hand crank eventually starts it moving again from track 2 on to track 3 and stops again.
Real, and most other model, turntables move smoothly, and continuously. Many are unhappy with the odd motion of the Atlas turntable. Many also don't care for the flat disc appearance of this turntable. There were prototypes built this way for use in heavy snow areas. The far more common layout of a depressed pit with a straight bridge rotating inside it, is prefered by most modelers. Shoveling a few tons of snow out of such pits was, well, "the pits!" The continuous deck, on the other hand, could simply be plowed clear.
The worst thing about the Atlas turntable is it's optional motorizing kit. This consists of a plastic shed containing the loudest electric motor in model railroading! The motor can be heard all over the house, and drives a worm gear that mates with the spur gears inside the turntable. My very old one had two rubber bands from the motor driving the worm gear. The bands didn't last long. Newer models may be improved in this area, I certainly hope so.
The Atlas turntable could be used for it's indexing by mounting it under the layout with a more conventional pit and bridge above it. I have recommended to HO modelers that they use the N-scale Atlas turntable this way, since, due to it's smaller size, it has the radial track slots closer together and thus shorter spurts of travel and a slightly less obvious stop/start motion.
I definitely don't recommend using the motorizing kit. Instead, I'd use a different, quieter, motor to turn the same axle that the hand crank does, or just keep the hand crank.

Traction Fan 馃槉
 

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Discussion Starter #3
USRA Guy;

I owned one of those Atlas turntables many years ago. Here's some pros and cons. On the plus side, the built in indexing is very good. The rails line up well with a piece of track fixed in any of the slots around the perimeter of the turntable. On the good or bad side, depending on the person, is that the gears & cams that line up the rotating track with the others so well, also causes the turntable move in "spurts." The table rotates from track 1 to track 2 and stops. Then, a ;lot of winding of the hand crank eventually starts it moving again from track 2 on to track 3 and stops again.
Real, and most other model, turntables move smoothly, and continuously. Many are unhappy with the odd motion of the Atlas turntable. Many also don't care for the flat disc appearance of this turntable. There were prototypes built this way for use in heavy snow areas. The far more common layout of a depressed pit with a straight bridge rotating inside it, is prefered by most modelers. Shoveling a few tons of snow out of such pits was, well, "the pits!" The continuous deck, on the other hand, could simply be plowed clear.
The worst thing about the Atlas turntable is it's optional motorizing kit. This consists of a plastic shed containing the loudest electric motor in model railroading! The motor can be heard all over the house, and drives a worm gear that mates with the spur gears inside the turntable. My very old one had two rubber bands from the motor driving the worm gear. The bands didn't last long. Newer models may be improved in this area, I certainly hope so.
The Atlas turntable could be used for it's indexing by mounting it under the layout with a more conventional pit and bridge above it. I have recommended to HO modelers that they use the N-scale Atlas turntable this way, since, due to it's smaller size, it has the radial track slots closer together and thus shorter spurts of travel and a slightly less obvious stop/start motion.
I definitely don't recommend using the motorizing kit. Instead, I'd use a different, quieter, motor to turn the same axle that the hand crank does, or just keep the hand crank.

Traction Fan 馃槉
Ok thanks.
 

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Well this was a useful post!! I just learned a lot! Thanks for this! Now I shall look at some different turn tables.


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Discussion Starter #5
One more question. Is the hand crank missing on it, or is the TT supposed to be like that?
 

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The Atlas TT is designed with a Geneva indexer which basically provide accel, decel, and in-position locking. That's the reason for the delay effect noted by traction fan. I think yours is missing the motor and shed (see the picture on the box.) I was unaware of the hand crank option.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The Atlas TT is designed with a Geneva indexer which basically provide accel, decel, and in-position locking. That's the reason for the delay effect noted by traction fan. I think yours is missing the motor and shed (see the picture on the box.) I was unaware of the hand crank option.
Would you happen to know where i could find the motor/shed for this (for a reasonable price)?
 
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