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You can find a lot of 1:43 scale models of Cords on E-bay, and from time to time, a few on Amazon. Prices are all over the map, but if you take take to search and wait for bargains, you can get some good models at reasonable prices.
 

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When I was graduated from high school, the summer of '64, a friend of mine and I rented a motorboat from a guy who had a dock on Lake Erie. When we brought the boat back, the rental fellow took us into an underground garage that had been once used to store boats in the winter time. There weren't any boats back then, but the facility contained six or seven (as I recall) Cord automobiles. None were junkers. They were a bit dusty but all looked like they could be started up and driven away. I asked the guy if they were for sale. He smiled, and told me that they would be for sale some day, but I would probably never be able to afford to buy one of them. He never said a price and I didn't ask.

They were the biggest, coolest cars I had ever seen. They were elegant monsters. He said he started collecting them just after WW2 and was going to use them for his retirement. I never went back, so I do not know whatever became of these cars.

I was driving a red 1960 Ford Sunliner convertible at the time and thought it was a super-cool car, until I saw those Cords.
 

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I’ve had this Matchbox model for many years. I always thought it was an 810, but after reading your thread, I looked on the bottom and sure enough it’s a 1937 812.

In the 60s, there was a continuation series of the Cord 810. Built to 8/10 scale and powered by a Corvair engine, it was called the Cord 8/10.

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The Cord is a very neat American product. I actually got a ride in one, though I wasn't offered the option of driving. It was the 1936 Phaeton convertible, owned by a guy that owned a local Mercedes dealership. He had a 12 car garage with some really super cool cars, the Cord really caught my eye. I used to do computer work for him at his house, and one day it was parked outside and he offered a ride, and I didn't turn it down! :D
 

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I may have seen one on the road back in the '60s but maybe it was one of the Corvair powered ones. I didn't even know those existed.
I have, however, visited the Auburn, Cord, Duisenberg Museum in Auburn Indiana. Quite the tribute to American craftsmanship. They even had a few Pierce Arrows made in my hometown. Highly recommended if you are ever in the area. Not that far from Mr Muffins for that matter.

Pete
 

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Cord sold the body tooling to Hupmobile but Hupmobile couldn't produce it. Graham built the Hupmobile Hollywood under contract, They also built and sold the Graham Skylark using the same tooling.
 

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Thanks, richard. Good to hear from you.

Hupmobile and Graham were too other long-established companies (Auburn had been founded in 1900) that could not compete with the big boys either. The time leading up to WWII was rather rough on the auto industry, and size mattered in any survival plans.
 

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That L-29 white convertible shown in one of the early photos in this thread would certain draw some attention cruising down the street. One would need to be wearing the proper vintage clothing though to make it complete.
 

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Thanks, richard. Good to hear from you.

Hupmobile and Graham were too other long-established companies (Auburn had been founded in 1900) that could not compete with the big boys either. The time leading up to WWII was rather rough on the auto industry, and size mattered in any survival plans.
My brother had an old supercharged 1936 Graham in the 50's, that was before they were worth any significant money. I'm not sure what he paid for it, but I know it wasn't much. It was decently fast for the time, but I don't recall blasting G-forces when accelerating. It was the 4-door model, not one of the cool looking models. :)
 

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My brother had an old supercharged 1936 Graham in the 50's, that was before they were worth any significant money. I'm not sure what he paid for it, but I know it wasn't much. It was decently fast for the time, but I don't recall blasting G-forces when accelerating. It was the 4-door model, not one of the cool looking models. :)
A supercharged Graham had a lot of power for its class, back then. But that was relative to what else was available - zero to sixty in fifteen seconds was respectable at the time. Today, fifteen seconds is about twice what a workaday Civic sedan will take.

We've come a long way in 70 years!
 

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It was fast for an old sedan at the time, but by then some pretty healthy V8's were around that were more than a match. However, it was a cool curiosity, the only super charged car I had ever seen at the time. Living in the middle of Wyoming at the time, not much in automotive technology came around locally.
 

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I read in the September 23 issue of Autoweek that what's left of Cord was sold at auction on Labor day for $88,000. The Buyer got the rights to produce licensed merchandise, parts and replica cars.
 

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Thanks, richard. Good to hear from you.

Hupmobile and Graham were too other long-established companies (Auburn had been founded in 1900) that could not compete with the big boys either. The time leading up to WWII was rather rough on the auto industry, and size mattered in any survival plans.
Kaiser-Frazer acquired the assets of Graham-Page and planed to introduce a postwar Graham.
 

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That L-29 white convertible shown in one of the early photos in this thread would certain draw some attention cruising down the street. One would need to be wearing the proper vintage clothing though to make it complete.
Reminds me of missing an opportunity.

I had power of attorney to sell a senior's coop. It had to be cleaned out. Some contents were sold to a antique dealer while other stuff went to family. A lot of 50's clothing and luggage went to the trash hauler.

My friend and neighbor restored a 1950's Lincoln Cosmopolitan. Perusing the the car's repair manual, I noticed an option for matching luggage. It looked just like the jettisoned coop luggage. I bet all the clothes would have provided a period outfit or two for him and his gal.
 

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"... and a 170+ HP engine. That power and lighter weight than the sedan gave it a top speed of over 115 mph (or some people claim up to 124 mph, which seams unrealistic to me). Regardless, it was one of the fastest cars in the world then."

I had a 1980 Triumph TR7 convertible. It weighed 2,800 lbs. It's 2 lt. engine, hampered by emission restraints of the time, produced all of 92 HP. I ran it up to 121 mph on interstate 80 in NJ. On the same stretch with the top down it max'ed out at 115 mph - increased wind turbulence causing extra drag.

On level ground, weight is not the determining factor for max speed. The most significant factor is the car's coefficient of wind resistance. The power needed to push through the air is the mathematical square of the speed. That is, to go twice s fast requires 4 times the power to push through the air. Rolling resistance and other factors come into play but aerodynamics rule max speed.

That's why the national speed limit was reduced to 55 after the 1970's oil embargos. Reducing speed from 70 mph to 50 will nearly halve the wind drag thus yielding much improved gas mileage reducing oil consumption.

While the TR7's limited horsepower was a detriment and it's wedge shape no guarantee of an aerodynamically efficient design, it did attract the attention of many "phillies" ;)
 
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