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Discussion Starter #1
I want to build a large yard to store trains. I have two choices, one entrance that can store the length trains I want to run or a drive through yard that will limit the size trains I can run. If I build it with one entrance it will require backing in or out with a train of up to 12 cars. What is the potential for derailment with this amount of reversing?
 

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Hi tk...the two yards I have on my layout have only one entrance to them, so I have to back the railcars in. I have seldom had any issues with derailments (usually it is that I forgot to make sure the turnout/s were fully flipped.

I always back slowly, which in my opinion is a little easier to do with DCC power. Once in a while I have slipped on the throttle and backed a little faster than I wanted, but it didn't cause any derailment. Hope this helps!

Chad
 

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kinda tagging along on this. I like the ideal of the drive through yard, I have a 6 x13 oval,that I can run two sets of trains, at any time. the only thing is, it's wide open in the center of it.so that's were I would like to put a drive
thur yard in. but I am not sure just how to do it. so it looks good also.

Ron
 

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Having the engine on the back, pushing, means you have to go slower because there's no pilot truck on the front end to steer the train into the curves. The trucks on the cars pivot, but the cars are lighter and therefore lift off the rails more easily. Back out slowly and you'll avoid problems. That said, the rest of the solution is in your rails. Smooth connections and gentle turns will save you a lot of grief. Think about parallel parking your car next to a curb. If your tire presses against the curb but can't find a grip on a smooth side, it'll slide along the curb. Give it a rough curb with something to grab onto and it will ride up onto the top of the curb: derailment.
 

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Ron...I have never designed a drive-thru yard...mostly because the extra turnouts needed gets kind of costly. It might be kind of hard for you to have a drive-thru yard in the middle of an oval. If I were to design one, I would probably make it come off of the mainline on the longest, straightest side and run parallel to the mainline track. You could have 3 or 4 parallel tracks that simply rejoin the mainline again. I like this idea because you can access the yard from both directions. This is the way I should have made my yard...I just couldn't get myself to buy the extra turnouts.

Chad
 

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the proper name would be stub yard and through yard or double ended yard.
in our modelling reality even stub yard takes considerable length so unless one has run in excess of 12-15 feet allocated specifically to yard module, i wouldn't even think about double ended. 6 car train will need 4 feet long arrival track, + ledder + lead track, so it adds up. and the OP mentioned 12 cars :eek:




if you plan everything right (sorry, can not find the full yard building guide at the moment) you will not be backing out. operations will be as follow:
* train will stop on arriving track.
* mainline power disconnects from the train and uses runaround track to get to the ladder (and then to storage perhaps).
* switcher shunts cuts of cars to and between classification tracks and later assembles a train on one of the "departure" tracks.
* mainline power couples to the train and pulls it away from the station





with that, if your trackwork is good pushing cars should not be any problems. i always test my track work by running 6+ car train full speed in pulling and pushing configuration in both directions.
 

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Tank is absolutely right. A double-ended yard does take a lot of room! That might be another reason I would shy away from it. He is also right that pushing cars is no big deal. On good track work, pushing cars seldom ever seems to cause a derailment.

I always back somewhat slowly...as Reckers said, "there is no pilot truck to steer the train." And to Tank's point, a higher speed on good trackwork should not cause a problem.

Chad
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the responses.

I will have about an 2x8 ft. area to work with. I am thinking of having an entrance to the East and the West. None drive through. To use the space best I am thinking of meshing the lines together. Is there a better way to get more space in that area?
 
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