Model Train Forum banner

1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I think I caught the Shay bug!

They are very interesting and way out of my price range!

I'll have to start dropping hints for my birthday!


Does anyone online have any good images of Shays?

Aaron drool drool drool pass the napkins
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,541 Posts
Try these websites:

This one has anything you want to know about shays: http://www.shaylocomotives.com/

This one is a video of my Bachmann Spectrum G scale 2 truck shay:http://www.youtube.com/user/SantaFe158#p/u/16/90Js7FsyqJk

Here's another video:
http://www.youtube.com/user/SantaFe158#p/u/15/6_i-hvVmrv0

My dad and I were in the same boat, it took us a few years and one night I found the shay in the videos above on ebay cheap and it had like 15 minutes to go, it was a battle to win it, we put our final bid in at literally the last second and got it for $250, so if you wait, you might find something, the O scale ones are ridiculous in price, the HO ones aren't too bad, what scale are you looking for?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I would be looking for HO or Hon3

I will have to save my cash and wait for the right moment.

they sure are interesting !

Thanks for the info
 

·
Railroad Tycoon
Joined
·
24,033 Posts
I think I caught the Shay bug!

They are very interesting and way out of my price range!

I'll have to start dropping hints for my birthday!


Does anyone online have any good images of Shays?

Aaron drool drool drool pass the napkins

Thats bad news?:rolleyes::D
It's only money enjoy spending it while you can.;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,256 Posts
I picked up this one, shortly after my dad passed away...we always meant to ride the Cass once, just never got the chance...





...Bachmann Spectrum 80 ton shay...
 

·
Railroad Tycoon
Joined
·
24,033 Posts
Nice Loco!:thumbsup:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,666 Posts
OK ... I'm a bit embarrased to ask, but what is the definition of a "Shay"?

Is it a generic term for a direct-drive (i.e., driveshaft and geared powertrain) loco, such as a Climax?

Niavely yours,

TJ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,541 Posts
OK ... I'm a bit embarrased to ask, but what is the definition of a "Shay"?

Is it a generic term for a direct-drive (i.e., driveshaft and geared powertrain) loco, such as a Climax?

Niavely yours,

TJ
Don't be embarassed, you have to learn somehow :D , the term "shay" comes from it's inventor, Ephariam Shay (I think that's how it's spelled) The shay has three vertical pistons on the engineer's side of the locomotive which power a horizontal, flexible. driveshaft, also on the engineers side which powers all the wheels through gears.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,541 Posts
Funny thing, I have a really awesome LHS and they have a couple of these sitting in the display case. I often wondered what they were, I don't recall the description saying "Shay". I never asked about them (don't know why) but they look pretty cool. I think they've been there for a while because the price is marked down on them.
Other locomotives like the shay were the climax and heisler, could be one of those, or a shay :) They were all geared logging/mining/industrial locomotives.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,256 Posts
As pointed out, the shay was designed to run off of two or three cylinder engines mounted vertically and to one side of the locomotive, coupled to drive shafts that turned beveled gears on each drive axle. Highly successful for their brute strength and ability to go over track that would make a bed wetter out of a mountain goat, the last one built (and the largest) was Western Maryland #6, still running on the Cass.

Climaxes used centrally mounted vertical engines or outside mounted cylinders run to flywheels with a drive train similar to a car's...the shafts ran to differential-like mechanisms in the center of the truck.

Heislers used two opposed cylinders perpendicular to the rails, similarly connected to a drive like a Climax, but with rod connected drivers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
nice loco Shaygets

on the bachman do the pistons and all the gears move?

That is a very nice looking engine.


Have you ridden the Cass since?

Thanks for all the great replies

Aaron Once bitten twice shy man
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,666 Posts
SantaFe & Shaygetz,

Thanks for the definitions! Quite clear, though I'm intrigued to learn of the differing cylinder setups that were developed way back when.

So on a 2- or 3-cylinder true Shay, were all cylinders working off the same steam pressure, or was it more of a compound setup, with steam discharge from the first cylinder being introduced to the second, and so on?

On the Shay in the photos above, I'm assuming that the tender is articulated from the main loco, and yet still has wheels that are gear-driven from the main propulsion system? One connecting shaft with differentials on both ends ???

I've ridden the Climax (or its cars, really) at Clark's Trading Post in Lincoln, NH. That old girl certainly pumps out some power. The drive shaft / gearing underneath the frame is pretty impressive. I recall (vaguely) a small 3rd cylinder under the frame that operates a breaking system, too.

Thanks, guys ... interesting stuff!

TJ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,541 Posts
SantaFe & Shaygetz,

Thanks for the definitions! Quite clear, though I'm intrigued to learn of the differing cylinder setups that were developed way back when.

So on a 2- or 3-cylinder true Shay, were all cylinders working off the same steam pressure, or was it more of a compound setup, with steam discharge from the first cylinder being introduced to the second, and so on?

On the Shay in the photos above, I'm assuming that the tender is articulated from the main loco, and yet still has wheels that are gear-driven from the main propulsion system? One connecting shaft with differentials on both ends ???

I've ridden the Climax (or its cars, really) at Clark's Trading Post in Lincoln, NH. That old girl certainly pumps out some power. The drive shaft / gearing underneath the frame is pretty impressive. I recall (vaguely) a small 3rd cylinder under the frame that operates a breaking system, too.

Thanks, guys ... interesting stuff!

TJ
Well, if you haven't figured this out yet, the two cylinder shays were smaller, (narrow gauge?) I'm just guessing but the three cylinder shays were standard gauge, possibly with a few exceptions.

As for the shay in the pictures above, the rear tender just contains water and is separate from the main locomotive and is powered by the drive shaft and more gears.

The shays came in a few different sizes, two and three trucks and I believe some railroad's actually used parts of scrapped shays and added a fourth truck to extend the water tank.

Overall, they are a cool locomotive with a neat history. :D :thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,256 Posts
I just love to run mine, just to watch the monkey motion of the rods and listen to it crank out 12000 rpms, only to be crawling like a snail.

The tenders had gear drives as well to take advantage of the added traction from a filled water tank. The pipe you see was used to pump water from local streams into the tender, eliminating the need for water towers. Most were wood burners, coal and oil were used in industrial models, though there were exceptions to the rule. The cylinders were all steamed together, compounds require much larger cylinders that wouldn't track well in the woods. There were 2, 3 and 4 truck models.

The most beloved shay was the Michigan California Lumber Company's #2. It weighed in at less than 12 tons, was built a wood burner and changed over to oil. It was 2 cylinder, 3' gauge, owned by several companies and ran for over 60 years before being retired to a museum. Interestingly, it had only one engineer the whole time, a man named Tom Jinkerson.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,666 Posts
Thanks for the technical / historical shay info, guys ... much appreciated! I've enjoyed the classroom learning!

Cheers,

TJ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Thanks for all the good info

Thanks to everyone for all of the good info.

Aaron - shay beginner
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,256 Posts
You're welcome guys...shays have been my favorite for many years. Never really studied them, just picked up bits along the road, my model of Mich-Cal #2 eludes me but I pursue it like Khan pursued Capt. Kirk...

It tests me...it tests me and I shall have it...
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top