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so I guess then my question is are these things worth anything? more so than my tyco or bachmans (sp) or life-lyke
 

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Tap, TJ is correct. Lionel is the major American manufacturer these days for O gauge equipment. Lionel HO is less well-known, but is simply a good product down-sized. The green box, as TJ pointed out, should be a train whistle: a small impeller or fan drives air through two channels, producing two tones. You have some really nice stuff, there!
 

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Tap, I didn't address the value question---I don't run HO, so I don't have a clue. Right now, you are posting in a thread for "How to Build a Layout". If you repost in the HO section, you have a better chance of getting a good answer.
 

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Tap,

In terms of value, I think that ebay-searching is likely your best research tool. The Lionel HO cars look to be in great shape, and you have all of the original boxes (also in great shape), so the tally might be surprising.

You may already know this, but if you're logged into eBay, you can type in a search phrase, then (in advance search tool) click on "completed listings" ... both those that did sell, and those that didn't. I find this tool most helpful to get a better stap at a "high/low" range for value estimates.

And remember ... in many cases, if things are not all that common, that can reflect in a higher market value.

Good luck!

TJ
 

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Hi Stuart. what brand/type of grass mat did you use for your layout?
Did you use track integrated with plastic ballast? or did you use sectional(standard) track and how did you secure it(i.e. brads, glue)?
Thank you for any info!
 

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I think they're both extruded polystyrene rigid foam, and essentially no major difference. I hope others here will confirm.

TJ
 

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there are grades in density

R3-R15 I think is what I saw the higher the R the more $$$

I like R5 but the higher stuff is much easier to carve mountains, less flakey
 

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The Blue foam is for the male modelers.
The Pink foam is for the female modelers.
:laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh:
I know I'm going to here it on that one!!!:dunno:

Density is the only difference, blue is denser I do believe?
Both work great, Just do not use the tan (Name slips my mind) or white it's way to light in density and really hard to carve.
 

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You know ya got it bad when you dream about building your layout. I did that last night.......
 

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Just new here and thinking about starting an N Scale project, but thought I would chime in about the foam boards.

The blue is permanently compressible and the pink is not. I used the blue for my horse when she had hoof problems. Her standing on blocks of the blue will compress it down to a shell that molded completely to the form of her hoof. It provided protection while her hooves healed.

I will add that there are a couple of different manufacturers of the blue, so if that is what someone feels might come in handy for their project, do a finger test on the sheet before you buy it.
 

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Foam Question

Evening guys...

Whats the best way to secure tracks to foam? I plan on building on top of my plywood to assist with the scenery and am curious at to how I should best secure the track (since they wont be nailed down).
 

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Rather than plywood has anyone considered MDF as the base of their layout? It's the compressed sawdust and resin product used a lot for floor underlayment. Not OSB,which is the chips glued together. I've used MDF for quick book shelves and 5 years later they have sagged just a bit, 1/4"-3/8" maybe but they were loaded with books and "stuff". No where near the weight of a HO layout.

MDF is denser and heavier than plywood, I think it would absorb sound better. Topped with homasote(sp?) for even more sound deading?

Other than eye appeal couldn't track be laid down without the cork or foam directly on the homasote?

Suggestions and opinions welcomed, as Sgt Schultz said "I know nothing"

Jack
 

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I've used MDF on a couple of layouts. I find it's a great dead-flat base surface, and very dimensionally stable with any changes in temp / humidity. Inexpensive to buy, and, one gets an extra "free inch": standard sheet is 49" x 97". Couple of downsides: MDF doesn't do well if it gets wet (puddled water), so it's important to avoid spills. And, its density makes it just a bit harder to drive brads for fastening track ties.

But all in all, I'm a big fan of MDF.

My local Home Depot stocks 3/4" and 1/2" thick sheets. If one hunts, you can find 1/4" sheets, too.

Even if one has a base table with a plywood top, I think a top "skin" of 1/4" MDF could add the benefit of a flatter starting surface.

TJ
 

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MDF is also used in the constuction of cabinets, and like TJ said, it's hard to drive brads into. Not to mention how much it weighs. I use a 1/2 inch thick fiber-insulation board. It's extremely light and cost less than $10.00 a 4 x8 sheet. I choose this material because it's very easy to drive track nails into with a track hammer, holds track secure, and the nails can later be easily extracted without destroying the track. The down side to it is that it tends to sag if not adequetly supported. So to counter this, I construct a table top frame, I then lay down the insulation fiberboard and secure it to the frame with one inch sheetrock screws.

In the past I've used other materials such as plywood, MDF, and foam. I didn't care for the plywood because the nail driving became a real chore and if I wanted to pull up the track later, sometimes it would result in destroying some of the ties if not the entire section of track while doing so. Though gluing is the best method to use with both MDF and foam, to tell you the truth, I've had mixed results with this method at best. So for me, I've just found it much easier, faster and more efficient using the insulation fiberboard. This may not be the norm, but it's worked very well for me.

When laying track, I use cork not because I need to, or that I think running trains is too loud without it, but simply because I like the way it looks. I like Woodland Scenics foam roadbed as well. It's very easy to work with, it's cheaper than cork and looks real nice when finished. It may not be exactly prototypical, but that's okay too. I like it.

Routerman
 

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You know ya got it bad when you dream about building your layout. I did that last night.......
my wife and I are just starting the process of buying a house... don't even know what house we are going to buy yet, but built my train room in it last night.
 
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