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Hi, I am a newbie to the HO trains. I recently bought a 4x9' layout and am having the problem that the tracks are not very level (ie in some spots there is not much clearance between the top of the track and the ties). This means that in these couple of spots the engine comes off. Wondering what is the best engine(s) to get for this problem. I am looking for a fairly inexpensive solution if possible (e.g. <=$40). Thanks! Alan
 

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Hi, I am a newbie to the HO trains. I recently bought a 4x9' layout and am having the problem that the tracks are not very level (ie in some spots there is not much clearance between the top of the track and the ties). This means that in these couple of spots the engine comes off. Wondering what is the best engine(s) to get for this problem. I am looking for a fairly inexpensive solution if possible (e.g. <=$40). Thanks! Alan
I think the solution to your problem is to fix the track.:confused:
If your tracks not right all engines will have problems on the sunken areas.
 

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Hi, I am a newbie to the HO trains. I recently bought a 4x9' layout and am having the problem that the tracks are not very level (ie in some spots there is not much clearance between the top of the track and the ties). This means that in these couple of spots the engine comes off. Wondering what is the best engine(s) to get for this problem. I am looking for a fairly inexpensive solution if possible (e.g. <=$40). Thanks! Alan
Hi Alan, :)

Is it an issue with the ties or the ballast? It's pretty hard to bury rail into the ties so that the wheel flanges will actually hit. Could you post a picture of the worst spot? It should be an easy fix. :):thumbsup:

Greg
 

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Alan,

FYI, a quick few bullet points on HO track. Several general types ...

1. "Code" refers to the actual height of the rails. Code 100 is traditional (been around longer) and has a higher profile rail. Code 83 is newer, and has a lower profile rail.

2. Rail material: traditional (older) is brass, which tarnishes quickly; cheap stuff is steel; newer / better stuff is nickel-silver, which looks chrome-like in appearance, and is much less prone to tarnish/oxidation, which, in turn, means better electrical conductivity for the trains.

3. Track-to-track connections ... traditional method (in any material above) is to join track sections with rail joiners. The track here has open ties clipped on to two rails ... the "normal" stuff. Several manufacturers make there version of "snap track" or "fast track" which has a stone "ballast" mound moulded into the track base. Sections of track have mating clips and electrical-contact flanges on their ends to connect pieces together. This track assembles quickly, is great for those who want to have mobile/portable layouts (seasonaly, around the Christmas tree, for example), but doesn't have the look/feel of real-world track, in my opionion.

So, with the points above, can you identify which type of track you have? That'll help narrow down your problems, and hopefully, a solution.

TJ
 

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Do you know if the previous owner ever tried to clean the track with a file or sand paper, or if it appears this way? I've been cleaning up old brass track for a good two weeks and if you don't use a fine hobby file it can gouge parts of the track from my experience.
 

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1. "Code" refers to the actual height of the rails. Code 100 is traditional (been around longer) and has a higher profile rail. Code 83 is newer, and has a lower profile rail.
...the height of the rail in thousands of an inch, i.e. Code 100 is .100" high, Code 83 is .083" high, etc. :thumbsup:
 

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:ttiwwop:


(I've been dying to that:laugh:)

Seriously, though, I would like to see pics of your track to see whats wrong

I clean my track with those green scrubby things my wife buys from WalMart:rolleyes:

Cheers, Ian
 

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Alen posts then never comes back?:confused:

Hello Matt, did you get that "junk" running?
 

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:ttiwwop:


(I've been dying to that:laugh:)

Seriously, though, I would like to see pics of your track to see whats wrong

I clean my track with those green scrubby things my wife buys from WalMart:rolleyes:

Cheers, Ian
Yes, really, pictures would make a world of difference here, and then someone will find you a solution, guarantee it:cool:

@Lester Perry: The files I'm using are equivalent to 1000-1400 grit sandpaper, when I'm done filing they're smooth as glass. The track I was cleaning was so dirty that after soaking in 91% alcohol for a week and then having Goo Gone put on them it still wouldn't come off.
 

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Yes, really, pictures would make a world of difference here, and then someone will find you a solution, guarantee it:cool:

@Lester Perry: The files I'm using are equivalent to 1000-1400 grit sandpaper, when I'm done filing they're smooth as glass. The track I was cleaning was so dirty that after soaking in 91% alcohol for a week and then having Goo Gone put on them it still wouldn't come off.
(edit: Lester to Scale... ;) )

Wow... that's really fine, Scale...

And I always thought 600 grit emery was fine for my sanding needs (just never on track).

Are they diamond grit? ...carbide?
How do you clean your files?

Greg
 

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Yes, I was replying to Lester, mainly for a "Kids this isn't what it looks like" moment:eek:. I have no clue what there made out of probably carbide tipped or what brand they are they just came in a plastic holder, they were formerly my dad's from when he worked at ATK. I clean them with compressed air since it won't do damage to the files and that has cleaned out everything I've filed with them (mainly plastic, and of course light corrosion)
 
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