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Yard Master & Research
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The shell is a long term project it is a 675 or 2025. without other parts there is no way to tell. I used the oven cleaner in a bag trick. It set overnight. It was more effective than a paint remover. That a black paint is tough.

Good advice.When working a shell like this it is important to have a block of wood underneath to support the draw bar. It was dropped at one time, so when I gave it a rub down the support cracked clean through. Evidently there was tension on the bar and it finally won.

Finished pictures are on page3 post number 30.






I was planning on using 224 parts to run it but The cost of getting the rest is the price of a used engine. I am not sure what I will do with it . but I plan on painting and fixing two broken areas for now..
 

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I wonder how that would work on aluminum? I've got one more car to go out of that set of old coaches.
 

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Yard Master & Research
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Discussion Starter #3
They make an aluminum cleaning gel. Can't remeber if it was an acid or base. Just read the oven cleaner directions and see if it is good foraluminum. It did say it was used on grills. Toaster ovens have Aluminum inserts too.
 

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I wonder how that would work on aluminum? I've got one more car to go out of that set of old coaches.
Oven Cleaner shouldn't hurt aluminum. I use Easy Off oven cleaner to clean plastic shells. (Works perfectly, all you have to do is put the object that you want strip in the sun for 10mins or so (Warm it up) and spray it. Use a brush to help the cleaner along, then dip object in bucket of water. Repeat about two times, and the object should look new!)

T-man - I found that stripping metal train parts, the best, is to use a paint stripper or a heavy base. For best results, put object in sun to warm it up, use a brush to help it along and dip in water. (Repeat until stripped). Warning: Don't use on plastic materials, it will eat/burn the plastic. :thumbsdown:
 

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Yard Master & Research
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Discussion Starter #5
Hmmm, the sun, mid Feb, New England, outside................... it will freeze.:D
I could wait until spring thaw!

I have been using a toothbrush to work the crevices. The bag, controls the fumes indoors. The pan helps to catch what leaks through.
The new paint removers work ,but aren't as good as the ones that will kill you from cancer. Those old paints are lead tough.:)
 

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Oven Cleaner shouldn't hurt aluminum. I use Easy Off oven cleaner to clean plastic shells. (Works perfectly, all you have to do is put the object that you want strip in the sun for 10mins or so (Warm it up) and spray it. Use a brush to help the cleaner along, then dip object in bucket of water. Repeat about two times, and the object should look new!)

T-man - I found that stripping metal train parts, the best, is to use a paint stripper or a heavy base. For best results, put object in sun to warm it up, use a brush to help it along and dip in water. (Repeat until stripped). Warning: Don't use on plastic materials, it will eat/burn the plastic. :thumbsdown:
*L* The one (paint stripper) I'm currently using burns skin! Get a little on your finger and in about 10 seconds, you know it. Scrub with a toothbrush and the lil micro-splashes that land on the back off your hand and forearm start to sting. T, the paint I'm taking off these would challenge your cancer-causing stripper, and there's multiple layers of it. Thank God I'm down to one last car!
 

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Hmmm, the sun, mid Feb, New England, outside................... it will freeze.:D
I could wait until spring thaw!

I have been using a toothbrush to work the crevices. The bag, controls the fumes indoors. The pan helps to catch what leaks through.
The new paint removers work ,but aren't as good as the ones that will kill you from cancer. Those old paints are lead tough.:)
Very true about New England in February. (Very Cold). I guess you couldn't perform (hot) techniques during winter but during summer you should try it. Instead of waiting all night for it to perform, I could do same job in about 30mins. Yes, I agree the old paint is very tough, but I wish Lionel still made it. Best paint to work with. :laugh:


Reckers:

Sounds like your using the same paint stripper. Last weekend, when I was doing my "Senior Project" (which I'll update this weekend) the paint stripper ate through my gloves. (Lucky for me I had water near-by.) Only negative about paint stripper is that you need heat. If you have oven cleaner laying around, try using it; it should work for you. :thumbsup:
 

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PW,

Thanks for the tip---I'll pick some up today and try it out this weekend. You're right about the gloves, too---when I bought it, I was cautioned that gloves were nice, but work fast because they wouldn't last very long! I've been using a plastic dishpan to work in/soak parts in, and so far it's gone unscathed.
 

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Yard Master & Research
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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
A typical hot day

I just could resist. Thanks for the idea.

Recker. a good stripper always stings.:rolleyes:

It is true, I am firm believer in heat by torch or heat gun or the sun.

I washed the boiler off in water. The surface water instantly froze. Looks cool.:cool:

Also shown are the areas I will try to fix. Hopefully by solder. I know epoxy will work.
I will have to wait and see.

 

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I just could resist. Thanks for the idea.

Recker. a good stripper always stings.:rolleyes:

It is true, I am firm believer in heat by torch or heat gun or the sun.

I washed the boiler off in water. The surface water instantly froze. Looks cool.:cool:

Also shown are the areas I will try to fix. Hopefully by solder. I know epoxy will work.
I will have to wait and see.


T-Man,

Speaking from experience...I was young, once...there is no such thing as a good stripper. *L*
 

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I had to forgo the oven-cleaner treatment. Grabbed a can of EZ-Off in a quick trip to the grocery; sort of in a rush. Got home and found it said not for aluminum. At this point, it appears I'll have to clean the oven with it.
Probably going to be too cold to work on that last coach, today; the buffing wheel's on the back porch. It 22F right now; the buffing compounds are a waxy base that crumble when they're frozen and don't work well. Just have to drink beer and get ready for the Superbowl. *L* Colts by 7, incidentally.
 

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T-Man,

Speaking from experience...I was young, once...there is no such thing as a good stripper. *L*
Gents ...

As a newbie to MTF, I've enjoyed poking around some threads and learning a few helpful tidbits over the past week or two. A few of you buffs have freely offered some insightful advice.

But that comment up above ranks right up there in the hallowed halls of wisdom from the likes of Einstein, DaVinci, Michelangelo, etc.

I see I have much to learn, my friends ... much to learn!
 

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Railroad Tycoon
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Gents ...

As a newbie to MTF, I've enjoyed poking around some threads and learning a few helpful tidbits over the past week or two. A few of you buffs have freely offered some insightful advice.

But that comment up above ranks right up there in the hallowed halls of wisdom from the likes of Einstein, DaVinci, Michelangelo, etc.

I see I have much to learn, my friends ... much to learn!

I knew of a good stripper once. Many MOONS ago.:D
 

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Yard Master & Research
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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Painted up

The shell got painted up. Being a 675 0r a 2025 I couldn't make up my mind so I will number it by the front boiler plate that I had from parts. 5056 I think. OOPS 5690 on the keystone sticker. This is the number that goes with these two engines. This black is more like a satin or eggshell than flat. The railing is brass on this. Brass rod was sold at that dollhouse place I recently visited. The unusual part is the aluminum smoke stack. It was painted on this one but some models had it natural.




I finished the clean up of the new 224 so I have a Bill and Ben now. The steam chest for both are whitish. I am not sure what I will do about that. I am not sure how well I can match the paint.
The ebay purchase is on the left. The box lot on the right got all new wiring of the eunit
 

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The railing is brass on this. Brass rod was sold at that dollhouse place I recently visited.
Doll house shop you say... good idea... I like the look of the brass... I think it gives it a very classy look, and the paint job is fantastic.....

what paint did you use on the final coats?
 

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Yard Master & Research
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Discussion Starter #18
Believe it or not, Walmart flat black. That wire is small it is under 1/16th. A hooby shop may carry the brass display. I am not sure if a craft store does. The gray primer is Walmart too!
 

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Believe it or not, Walmart flat black. That wire is small it is under 1/16th. A hobby shop may carry the brass display. I am not sure if a craft store does. The gray primer is Walmart too!

I'll go check that out.... I found the Krylon's Satin Black matches the Steamers very well....Got that at a craft store.... I have been using Rustoleum Black primer on the bare metal.... got that at the home center

A 200 watt Shop flood light makes a good paint baker on the metal parts
 

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Yard Master & Research
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Discussion Starter #20
I have used Krylon. I just use a heat gun to get parts to temperature. A heat lamp is a good idea for metal parts. I always use a primer on metal or old paint. I don't know my wattage it is around 200. The secret for Walmart is that it is thin paint not thick for coverage. I find this a great advantage.
 
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