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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've done a bunch of cars that either had their roofwalks removed and ladders shortened or were built without them. I think I have that topic covered. What I have no idea about is what gets painted what when roofwalks are used? Carbody color? Galvanized roof and painted wood roofwalks (if so, any typical coloration)? Damfino. And I can't recall ever reading any mention of the topic. Out of sight (from ground level where most pictures get taken) out of mind, I guess.

I'd be grateful to get enlightened, as I have a few 40' cars with roofwalks in the paint queue.

Thanks very much.
 

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In my experience, the roof is usually the same colour as the car sides, but it will vary from car to car, and railroad to railroad.....reefers and insulated cars sometimes had silver/aluminum roofs, and sometimes ends as well....

Google "boxcar roof colours" and take a look at "images".....you may get some ideas from that.....
 

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They were usually painted, and usually the body colour. (Pullman-Standard painted a lot of cars they produced with contrasting black ends and roof unless the buyer really specified otherwise.)

Under the paint the roof was galvanized steel, and older cars that hadn't been repainted, the paint could sometimes fail and flake off.

Here's a good view of a car where the bare galvanized steel roof has been completed exposed, but the second car in the background (which is a repainted car within the 10 years prior to the photo date) has a clearly fully painted roof.


This old car the paint is just as old but in better shape. Since the car dates from the steam era, the roof is dark with years of accumulated soot and grime:


Another complete failure down to bare galvanized metal, with the corner of a repainted car in the right foreground, also showing some severe paint degradation for a ~10 year old paint job:


Another one showing four different cars in various states of extreme paint failure on the roof. Again, note the red car at foreground-right, this paint job is ~10 years old at the time of the photo but has completely failed and worn away from the horizontal surface of the galvanized roof (note how some red remains where the roof stamping curves around to vertical where it's riveted to the car sides:


And one last clearly-painted-but-partly-flaked roof:

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
They were usually painted, and usually the body colour. (Pullman-Standard painted a lot of cars they produced with contrasting black ends and roof unless the buyer really specified otherwise.)

Under the paint the roof was galvanized steel, and older cars that hadn't been repainted, the paint could sometimes fail and flake off.

Here's a good view of a car where the bare galvanized steel roof has been completed exposed, but the second car in the background (which is a repainted car within the 10 years prior to the photo date) has a clearly fully painted roof.


This old car the paint is just as old but in better shape. Since the car dates from the steam era, the roof is dark with years of accumulated soot and grime:


Another complete failure down to bare galvanized metal, with the corner of a repainted car in the right foreground, also showing some severe paint degradation for a ~10 year old paint job:


Another one showing four different cars in various states of extreme paint failure on the roof. Again, note the red car at foreground-right, this paint job is ~10 years old at the time of the photo but has completely failed and worn away from the horizontal surface of the galvanized roof (note how some red remains where the roof stamping curves around to vertical where it's riveted to the car sides:


And one last clearly-painted-but-partly-flaked roof:

Thanks very much.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
They were usually painted, and usually the body colour. (Pullman-Standard painted a lot of cars they produced with contrasting black ends and roof unless the buyer really specified otherwise.)

Under the paint the roof was galvanized steel, and older cars that hadn't been repainted, the paint could sometimes fail and flake off.

Here's a good view of a car where the bare galvanized steel roof has been completed exposed, but the second car in the background (which is a repainted car within the 10 years prior to the photo date) has a clearly fully painted roof.


This old car the paint is just as old but in better shape. Since the car dates from the steam era, the roof is dark with years of accumulated soot and grime:


Another complete failure down to bare galvanized metal, with the corner of a repainted car in the right foreground, also showing some severe paint degradation for a ~10 year old paint job:


Another one showing four different cars in various states of extreme paint failure on the roof. Again, note the red car at foreground-right, this paint job is ~10 years old at the time of the photo but has completely failed and worn away from the horizontal surface of the galvanized roof (note how some red remains where the roof stamping curves around to vertical where it's riveted to the car sides:


And one last clearly-painted-but-partly-flaked roof:

Longer look at photos - - - interesting CN cars, one without roofwalk, galvanized roof evident, partial car at top of picture, red painted roof. also no-roofwalk car. All kinds of combinations.

Roofwalks - - - originally painted to match the painted roof, but weathered differently, or uniquely finished. One car had paint washed away from the underlying galvanized roof, and the roofwalk was quite dark, a large contrast in appearances.

And, again, I'm obliged to all of the folks who took time to help educate me. Thanks again.
 

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Paint does not readily stick to galvanized metal. The zinc coating on the surface of the galvanizing process is meant to resist corrosion and also resists paint. The roofwalks are untreated mild steel which accepts paint.

On a close look at the pictures cv_acrs posted u can see where the walkways were removed from the other cars.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Paint does not readily stick to galvanized metal. The zinc coating on the surface of the galvanizing process is meant to resist corrosion and also resists paint. The roofwalks are untreated mild steel which accepts paint.

On a close look at the pictures cv_acrs posted u can see where the walkways were removed from the other cars.
So that's what I'm seeing. Thanks very much.
 
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