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I was going thru ebay to see if I could find a "cheap" Locomotive and I come across this one. It is a Intermoutain SD40. I was just wondering how can you do this much damage to one? I do not think this will be covered under warranty. Try to fine parts for them .:dunno:
 

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Not so bad?

I was going thru ebay to see if I could find a "cheap" Locomotive and I come across this one. It is a Intermoutain SD40. I was just wondering how can you do this much damage to one? I do not think this will be covered under warranty. Try to fine parts for them .:dunno:
bewhole;

From what I can see in your photo, it doesn't look all that bad. I'm assuming the motor still runs. The long brass strips coming out of the loco look like they ride on the center brass tabs on the truck. I'm not sure how the truck was held in the frame. One common system, at least on N-scale locos is to use a metal shaft that threads through the center of the large spur gear at the top of the truck's gear train, as a retainer. The possible problem with that theory is that the loco appears to have an electrically split frame. If the steel shaft went through that gear, it might touch both halves of the frame and cause a short. Can Intermountain provide an exploded view, or any other help? How is the other truck held in the locomotive?

Good luck;

Traction Fan :smilie_daumenpos:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
bewhole;

From what I can see in your photo, it doesn't look all that bad. I'm assuming the motor still runs. The long brass strips coming out of the loco look like they ride on the center brass tabs on the truck. I'm not sure how the truck was held in the frame. One common system, at least on N-scale locos is to use a metal shaft that threads through the center of the large spur gear at the top of the truck's gear train, as a retainer. The possible problem with that theory is that the loco appears to have an electrically split frame. If the steel shaft went through that gear, it might touch both halves of the frame and cause a short. Can Intermountain provide an exploded view, or any other help? How is the other truck held in the locomotive?

Good luck;


Traction Fan :smilie_daumenpos:
LOL look closer the frame is all busted up not the truck.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
This one is crystal clear to me, that's rotten zinc!

Huh never see it rot like that.I was wondering how it could have been damaged like that and the trucks not damaged. you are right. Now where would you get a frame for it tho. They will not deal with you unless it is within the warranty.( I have delt with them in the past) LOL
 

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If you are any good with lead you could make your own frame. If that frame is well enough to get a casting off of. That’s just my thoughts. Lead is easy to smelt with a propane torch. You just might need some fishing weights lol


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How old is it? You mentioned the "damage" being covered by warranty. I always thought zinc pest was associated with older castings, not new ones, burning this is new, definitely send it back.
 

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How old is it? You mentioned the "damage" being covered by warranty. I always thought zinc pest was associated with older castings, not new ones, burning this is new, definitely send it back.
It is not mine. I see this on ebay. They been making it since 2006 or so.
 

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That's definitely zinc pest. The cracking, plus the way it's contorting the body outward. You could get a new frame, but there's no telling how much additional damage has been done to the innards. Zinc pest can easily set in a decade or even less if the metal has the right impurities..

If you already owned it, there's nothing to loose by disassembling, clamping, possibly shaping and filling the cracks with superglue. I know some guys have "fixed" rot like that, but then you have to keep an eye on it because it may likely come back. That said, I'd never buy a loco like that unless it was super-cheap and I already had a replacement frame on-hand.
 
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