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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, to sum up... Train fall down, go boom. As you can see from the photos it was a pretty clean break. I'm looking for ideas on how to best repair. I've already discovered solder does not stick as you can see from the schmutz on the edge of the pilot platform.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated as I have my Polar Express layout all set up and would hate to not have good ol' 1225





 

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Railroad Tycoon
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The T man would epoxy that up to look like new....better then new.:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I read a thread on CTT while looking for ideas and someone said to epoxy a back plate since the repair will be at a very weak point. I was thinking of screwing a back back that the pilot could rest on and be epoxied to but would like to screw the plate into the horizontal part from below. Anyone have any tips on drilling into the metal?
 

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Yard Master & Research
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I would go crazy with a cutting wheel and fit up a postwar steam chest. Then if you break it again:eek: just change it out.:cool:

Another option is to mold up a complete front then attach it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
T, what do you mean by a post war steam chest?


Edit: googled it. Hmmm, might be kinda fun to do something like that, but I'm a little Leary of getting too deep into customizing as I'd hate to end up in a place that I can't fix my way out of.
 

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The metal is an alloy of zinc and drills relatively easily. Make sure you lube the bit with WD-40 or some other lubricant or it may weld itself to the metal. Don't ask how I know these things. You could drill and tap for 2 or 3 4-40 screws and grind off whatever sticks through the hole. Take a piece of brass and make something to reinforce the pilot from the rear. It appears that the center bar of the pilot is large enough you could drill and tap it for some 2-56 or 1-72 or 0-80 screws. You can buy small screws and taps from McMaster Carr. When you are tapping the holes, lube the tap with WD-40 and hold the tap wrench in one hand and the work piece in the other hand. This reduces the chance of breaking the tap. Be gentle. Make sure the tap is going straight into the hole and don't force anything.
 

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Yard Master & Research
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The whole lower front, bolts on to the boiler from the underside including the steps. No one ever asked to see a picture before. Ebay has shells with and without the steamchest. I am not familiar with the engine so it may not even work. The whole upper part of yours will have to be filled in to have something to grab and hold. You will lose some grating.

This is just an example and not the best choice. The 224 does not have the boxy front.

 

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I would think a good 5 minute epoxy would be a much better, stronger adhesive than JB Weld. I'd use the epoxy to adhere the pilot, then possibly JBW or Bondo to smooth out the body work before painting. What a mess.
 

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what about unscrewing the steam chest from the main body and replacing the whole front like the old 442 lionels? can you do this because that would be best look. all the JB weld might still be weak and fall off from the thumping around the platform.

not easy!
Chris
 

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I would JB-Weld (the slow-cure stuff) in two steps ...

1. Epoxy on the cowcatcher ... you may want to grind / even-out the mating segements, first.

2. After that fully cures, I would go back and add 3 small bent flatbars to the back of the pilot ... one on either side, and one in the center ... each bent to about 120-degrees from the underside of the flat deck to the back of the cowcatcher rails.

My thinking, anyway.

TJ
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thank you. All great ideas. I think I'll go with the epoxy though and suport with a brass backing.

Of course, first I need to solve the wobble. I need to determine if it's the tires or a bent axle. Based on how the axles are put together and what it would cost to fix on my own I might be better off just buying a new loco on ebay if the price is right. I'd rather fix, but just a thought.
 

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but wait, the little 1225 berk. is so plentyfull, why even bother with tring to repair it? I would just get a replacement,and keep this one for parts.
I mean, we are not talking a lot of money here, it not like this is a rare loco or something JMO...........Mike :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
You're right, but I'm having fun learning about fixing trains thru this one right now. Now it's a challenge to get it working which makes it more fun. If I fail I will for sure be getting another. It's a pretty rugged loco even though it's been thru hell.
 
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