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Discussion Starter · #421 ·
Thanks Pete.

The WAG was originally the Buffalo and Susquehanna Railroad. The B&S was absorbed by the B&O during the depression and then the B&O abandoned the line in the 50’s. The WAG took over what was left basically, as a entity of the Salzburg brothers holdings. They were known for running a Centercab GE locomotive originally built for Ford Motor Company and then using Ex SP F units for motive power. The railroad road was abandoned and ripped up in the early 70’s.

Many stations survived. The corporate headquarters in Galeton was just torn down recently. There is a great book called “The B&S” by Paul Pietrak. It has been out of print for years, but it is often found on eBay. I highly recommend it!

Tom
 

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Thanks Tom. I will check it out. Maybe I can ride some of the old roadbed on my dual sport If I can find it.
Pete
 

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Discussion Starter · #423 ·
Much of it in PA, like Newfield Jct, where the interchanged with the C&PA, are accessible but on private land. The land owners usually allow people to explore though…

In New York, I am not sure what remains other than the original roadbed of the B&S Buffalo Line that was abandoned in 1916. The Arcade and Attica uses some of the original B&S alignment too..

Here is a Facebook group that has interesting WAG content…


Tom
 

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Thank you Lou. That means a lot coming from you!

The WAG gondola took quite a bit of trimming (See the debris pile in the photo below). The Tichy decals are one solid sheet, so there is much cutting. Trimming close is definitely a technique that makes for better looking paint jobs.

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The K4 decals are the same, requiring trimming. It makes such a difference in the long run…

Tom
You're doing a great job with the decal trimming. I do like Microscale's decals as they tend to have the film tight around the lettering, but they obviously don't make all the decals one could want. It's tedious to trim close to the decals, but it really pays off in the end. Laying down a nice, smooth, finish is also key to hiding decal film. Seems like you've doing a great job. I've noticed a dearth of 40' boxcars decorated in the plain brown Southern Pacific scheme (everything seems to be Overnight service cars) so I'll have to start picking up some cheap Weaver cars and painting my own. Well after I finally start on my AT&SF Mikado project.

Something I've found is you don't have to gloss clear and entire model before decaling sometimes. If the area I'm decaling is smooth (i.e. not a wood sided car) and the paint I'm using is flat or satin I'll actually gently polish the area I'm decaling with Meguiar's auto polish to give it a sheen. Then decal, Microsol/Microset, and flat or satin clear the entire model. That results in less paint layers and more details coming through, with no visible decal film. The ATSF 20K tender was satin black. I just polished the areas where the decals were going, applied decals (Microscale), then Microsol, then flat clear. Decal film is invisible.
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Discussion Starter · #425 ·
Wow, a great technique! I have an occasional misfire and I end up stripping the car and starting over. The polishing idea sounds like a good idea. I will definitely try it.

As far as boxcars, I have been buying Weaver cars painted for various commemorative events that no body wants. I recently picked up five of them for $20. They only issue is that they don’t have trucks. I pick up the MTH Weaver pattern trucks when I find them.

MTH premier boxcars are another good source. Look for York commemorative cars or Seminar cars. They are usually pretty cheap, Like $15 on eBay, and have diecast trucks. Again, not to many people want them. I usually swap out the roller bearing trucks for friction bearing trucks depending on the era car I am doing…

Tom
 

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Wow, a great technique! I have an occasional misfire and I end up stripping the car and starting over. The polishing idea sounds like a good idea. I will definitely try it.

As far as boxcars, I have been buying Weaver cars painted for various commemorative events that no body wants. I recently picked up five of them for $20. They only issue is that they don’t have trucks. I pick up the MTH Weaver pattern trucks when I find them.

MTH premier boxcars are another good source. Look for York commemorative cars or Seminar cars. They are usually pretty cheap, Like $15 on eBay, and have diecast trucks. Again, not to many people want them. I usually swap out the roller bearing trucks for friction bearing trucks depending on the era car I am doing…

Tom
It works well. The only thing to remember is that you are removing a little bit of paint when polishing (you'll see some come off on the towel) so don't get aggressive. Just a light touch to smooth the paint and get a sheen.

I've been thinking of grabbing the exact cars you're talking about. Just cheap, scale, boxcars painted up for fake things/events and decal away. I'm kinda waiting for train shows to start back up again by me so I can grab the $10-20 cars without having to pay shipping, to keep the cost even lower. What are you using to strip the paint off of plastic cars? I've used Purple Power in the past but it takes about a day to do it's job. Nice thing about die cast stuff is that I can just brush on aircraft stripper and the paint is completely off in 15 minutes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #427 ·
On the plastic, I use 90% isopropyl alcohol. I let it soak for a couple days. Some paint, like the type on MTH cars is a bit more stubborn. I use the Scalecoat "wash away" stripper. It is a brake fluid type that Scalecoat makes.

I haven't tried purple power yet. I am usually slow with my work, so I don't mind waiting a couple days for everything to loosen up..

Tom
 

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A few more pics. I added 2 & 1/2 ounces of weight to the underside, brings them up to 3 &1/2 -4 ounces. When using the Harbor Freight truck weights, smack them with a hammer to flatten them . Installed KADEE 805'S or 806's, whichever I had on hand. I made a deck of 0.030 styrene whith nubs over the couplers. On the prototype those nubs are there to protect the couplers from being welded together in case of a spill. A couple of details are next, a fillet around the deck to soften the edges, and bearing caps on the sides.
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When they're all finished, then a trip to the paint shop.
Enjoy!
Since I was on this kit bashing stint, I decided to build a model that I saw in O SCALE TRAINS, issue 88, the 2 rail magazine. Thomas Yorke gave plans and a build of an idler car, one that was coupled between hot metal cars so steel workers could cross from one side of the train to the other safely. He did it in 2 rail so I tried my luck in 3 rail. I started with an Atlas 4 wheel bobber caboose, cut it in half and rejoined the sections together with the stairs in the center.
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I then built out the sides with strip styrene, added a deck and ends, gave it some extra weight, and added a pair of Weaver couplers. On the deck I emulated Yorke's model by adding 4 pieces of styrene to look like the tops of weight boxes with lifting rings. The handrails are 1mm brass wire bent to shape. Next stop is the paint shop along with the ingot buggies.
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Hope you like them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #429 ·
Interesting car that one would never think of. Nice workmanship on the car.

The glowing slag pit looks great too!

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #433 ·
Working on my tank train. I am piecing together the wood blocking used under each tank. Lots of wood work, assembling the side braces and scribing and staining the pieces.

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I have amassed 10 M4 Shermans from Corgi. The paint jobs are assorted, but they are all going to be repainted as factory fresh Olive Drab with only serial numbers painted on the hull sides. I need to add canvas covers to the gun muzzles and machine gun ports. The work will result in a five car train of tanks being delivered to the Quartermaster Corp.

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Tanks were shipped on 40’ flats and 50” flats when available. Each tank was about 33 tons. The typical 40’ flat car was made to carry 55 tons. 50’ flats had a higher capacity. Photo evidence shows both size cars used for shipping tanks. There is quite a bit of discussion about specific capacities and what was actually allowed to be loaded. The B&M 33000 series flat cars were actually allowed to carry 132000 lbs, making them good for the 132000 lbs of two Sherman tanks when loaded. Wartime allowances….

Here we see 60 tons of M3 Lee tanks on a 50 ton flat car…a bit squashed!

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More to follow…

Tom
 
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