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Discussion Starter · #662 · (Edited)
Excellent! The detail really jumps out with the mild weathering. The various lanyards are well done. Just the right size.

The tender looks really cool from above too! I didn’t know the UP used oil burners. Sharp engine!

Tom
 

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Excellent! The detail really jumps out with the mild weathering. The various lanyards are well done. Just the right size.

The tender looks really cool from above too! I didn’t know the UP used oil burners. Sharp engine!

Tom
Thanks Tom, I’m just try to be like you, haha! Your efficiency and ability to knock out freight car projects is impressive!

UP had a lot of oil burners, especially their subsidiaries OWR&N, OSL, LA&SL. Of course Pacifics as I modeled, but they also used 2-10-2s, Mountains, and many more.
 

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Locomotive is finished!

Quick review. Airbrushed with Scale Coat paint, decals from various sources (numbers are individual cut and aligned), cab windows/number boards came from a clear plastic container, and weathered with acrylics.
My goal was a “used” locomotive, not an end of life cycle look.

Before:
View attachment 568227

After:

View attachment 568228
View attachment 568229
View attachment 568230
View attachment 568231
Looks awesome. Great decal work as well!
 

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I've been working on the Premier PS1 ATSF Northern I picked up. I have a PS3 version with a bunch of added detail the PS1 version lacks, so I'm adding those details before I upgrade the electronics. I added a functional extendable stack along with the pneumatic stack motor motor, pop off valves painted, smokebox door painted, bell bracket with air ringer and clapper added, bell and whistle cords run, handrails chemically blackened, cab interior painted, and cab glass added. I'll be stripping the chassis over the weekend and chemically blackening the driver rims.

Train Gas Machine Auto part Wood
Automotive tire Vehicle Wood Floor Rolling
Wood Metal Musical instrument Engineering String instrument
Lcd projector Automotive design Gadget Automotive exterior Motor vehicle
 

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Discussion Starter · #666 ·
Lou, still one of my favorite steam engines. I really have to add one to the collection. You seem to gravitate towards the MTH models. Did Lionel ever make the same model?

Your current project looks interesting. I like the idea of blackening the drivers. Makes the locomotive look more realistic!

Tom
 

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Lou, still one of my favorite steam engines. I really have to add one to the collection. You seem to gravitate towards the MTH models. Did Lionel ever make the same model?

Your current project looks interesting. I like the idea of blackening the drivers. Makes the locomotive look more realistic!

Tom
Lionel and MTH have both made scale models of different ATSF Northern classes. Lionel (and 3rd Rail) made the early 3751 class. MTH (and 3rd Rail) made the later 2900 class. The 2900s were larger in every dimension than the 3751 class. I have the latest Legacy release of the 3751 class from Lionel as well as two 2900 class locomotives from MTH. Most of my steam locomotives are MTH Premier because, for awhile, I was getting them cheaper than I could ever find any Lionel model. Besides my MTH SP GS4/GS6 & UP FEF Lionel hasn't made models of the MTH locomotives I have (AT&SF 2900, 3460, 5001, 5011 class, SP AC6, DM&IR M3) so MTH was the way to go.

I plan on blackening the drivers this weekend. Since I'm using a chemical process I have to remove everything on the chassis to just get it to wheels and frame. It should be much, much more durable than just painting the rims with paint.
 

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Lou,
Can you describe how you do this? I’m very interested and want to try.
I'll post up what I do tomorrow after it's done. Basically it's using a chemical blackening solution that is used to blacken fasteners for car restoration. The solution won't damage paint, so it's perfect for this. First step is stripping the chassis bare, which I've done, then degreasing it before dunking it in the solution. My friend Pat came up with this process, and has done it several times, so I'll see how it goes tomorrow.

Wheel Combat vehicle Automotive tire Motor vehicle Vehicle
 

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Discussion Starter · #670 ·
My RS3 project continues. After a lot of masking, I primed the hand rails and steps. The Tamiya primer dries quickly. After a few hours, I painted the yellow portions of the handrails and steps.

Rectangle Wood Font Gas Brick




The body received two new air horns and the shell/cab was primed. The top coat, Scalecoat II Black gives a nice glossy finish, perfect for decaling. The engine frame was also painted.

Rectangle Road surface Wood Asphalt Gas


Automotive tire Motor vehicle Gas Font Composite material


Tomorrow, decal work starts. The trucks and pilot will also be assembled…

Tom
 

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So here's how you blacken steel driver tires on a MTH PS1 locomotive. I borrowed this process from my friend Pat. You'll need:
Black Oxide solution: BLACK OXIDE CONCENTRATE 1 PINT
WD40
A heat gun
400 grit sandpaper
Scotchbrite pad
Toothbrush
Compressed air

Mix up the solution according to the directions. You'll want enough to totally submerge the chassis. A plastic tote is a good container for this purpose.

Fully strip the chassis bare. Degrease it. Get ALL the grease/oil off. When your done with that go back and scuff the driver tires and axle ends with 400 grit sandpaper. Degrease again and wash with Dawn and hot water. Blow off any excess water.

Dunk the chassis in the solution (make sure to wear gloves, it’s an acid after all). You should see the tires and axle ends blacken. Remove the chassis and rub the tires and axle ends with Scotchbrite (blackening will come off). Resubmerge the chassis and use the Toothbrush to agitate the solution into the tires and axle ends. When you're happy with how dark it is rinse the chassis with hot water, blow dry with compressed air.

Get your heat gun nice and warm and start heating the chassis with it. Once the chassis is warm spray it down with WD40. The chassis should be hot enough that the WD40 smokes on contact with the wheels. Let it cool and blow off any extra WD40 with compressed air. Once the chassis is cool heat it again. Let cool. Repeat 2-3 times, blowing off any extra WD40. Once done let the chassis sit for a couple hours and wipe off any remaining WD40.

This process turns this:
Wheel Combat vehicle Automotive tire Motor vehicle Vehicle

Into this:
Wheel Automotive tire Motor vehicle Tread Vehicle


The heat and WD40 seals the oxide on the surface. Caswell makes a sealer but it isn't electrically conductive, which is not good for wheels. Once you're done this won't rub or chip off like paint. It's basically the equivalent of a factory blackened drive tire.
 

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That's really cool Lou, a lot of work, but a great result! Being the lazy sort, I'd be tempted to try black cold gun bluing on them. I may have to give that a go... :)
How long does the gun bluing last/how durable is it/does it conduct electricity? The method I used basically bonds to the surface. It won't rub off and conducts electricity. The only way the oxide is coming off is with mechanical abrasion (i.e. sanding).
 

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Bluing is pretty rugged, even cold bluing. I wouldn't put it on the tread, as I don't know how well it might conduct, though I tested it in the past and it did read with an ommeter.
Hmm. Might work then. It would at least work on the axle ends and possibly the edges of the wheel tire.
 

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I would try common gun blue first. I have had good luck with it on trucks and couplers. It may work on wheel plating too. Depends on the plating. Caswell has chemicals that work on harder to darken metals like some stainless and music wire. I always try the simple stuff first.

Pete
 

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Bluing is pretty rugged, even cold bluing. I wouldn't put it on the tread, as I don't know how well it might conduct, though I tested it in the past and it did read with an ommeter.
Found this on ChemEurope.com

"Historically, razor blades were often blued steel. A non-linear resistance property of the blued steel of razor blades, foreshadowing the same property that would later be discovered in semi-conductor diode junctions, along with the ready availability of blued steel razor blades, led to the use of razor blades as a detector in the crystal set AM radios which were often built by soldiers during World War II."
 
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