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This oil is meant for use on wind-up clocks with metal gears, I take it. Clocks like a couple of chiming clocks I have. It doesn't appear to claim it is safe for plastics.
 

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So can I get away with only using 106? Or should I use that and 108?
It sounds like you're trying to go cheap. Don't do it. Where maintaining your trains is concerned, you only want to use quality products. Labelle's 106 and 108 are completely different products with different applications, and yes, you should get both. Grease (106) is used for gears, oil (108) is used for other parts of the drive train. And for couplers and axles, most of us would recommend a dry graphite lubricant.
 

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I'm going to order the 106 and 108 combo. Soon as my hand heals from surgery I'll get to work on the engines. Got two N scale and an HO to clean.
That combo is more oil than you are likely to use in a lifetime, let alone on three locomotives. Either 106 or 108 will work fine on your locos. You only need a drop or two on the gears. Running the loco will spread the tiny amount of oil where its needed. By the way, one characteristic of clock oil is that it does not spread. A drop on a clock bearing stays intact for years. Not good for model trains. Neither is too much oil.

Traction Fan 🙂
 
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