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A friend asked me to make him 2 coal ash loads for some Intermountain Lehigh Valley 2 bay hoppers. I collected some ashes from my son's stoker, and some from a nearby long since extinguished mine fire. I ground both to a suitable size, and blended them together. There are some chunks of unburned coal in the mix as per my friends request, (which does occur in actual coal burning).
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Cinders! Railroads used them for ballast in tracks back in the day. They had tons of the stuff from steam railroads.

Tom
 

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Cinders were used for many different things. On the Ashley Planes near where I live, it was a remote location on a steep incline from Ashley to Mountain Top, so the cinders from the steam plants that drove the cables for the Barney cars, were just dumped in piles. Cinders were used for leveling stone side walks, and as anti slip on icy walks and roads. They were used to make cinder-crete, a lightweight form of concrete used to make house foundations, (mine included), and cinder blocks, which I preferred over concrete blocks. Fly Ash, from cinders is still used in the making of cement and concrete, and I believe fertilizer.
 

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A friend asked me to make him 2 coal ash loads for some Intermountain Lehigh Valley 2 bay hoppers.
Nice modeling. How did you insert the pic's into the post? The only way I saw to view them full size was right-click, open in new tab.
 

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You can just click on the pic and it will show full sized.
To turn off full sized just click somewhere off the pic and you'll return to the thread.
At least that worked for me.

Magic
That didn't work when I first tried it. Works now. Perhaps the new S/W was extremely slow to respond and I closed the page before I saw the full size image.

DonF take note: you pics appear to be fine.
 

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Don, those loads look great. Looks nearly identical to the material here in SW Pennsylvania that we used to call "red dog". Many of the coal companies here had large piles of refuse/tailings that would occasionally ignite from spontaneous combustion due to the chemical makeup and pressure of the pile. After burning, some of the rock, shale, ash and "poor" coal would take on a reddish color and the end result looked a lot like your ash loads. For decades, through the late 60's-early 70's, many rural/country roads and quite a few driveways in this area were "paved" with red dog.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Nick,
Thanks. That's interesting about roads being paved with coal cinders. Was it mixed with other harder material? Seems like ash wouldn't hold up well due to its softness and easy crushability.
 

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Don,

Most of the time it was used just the way it was dug out of the refuse pile. It was a much cheaper alternative than slag, rock or gravel as it was usually free if you dug it yourself for driveway use. After a time, the red dog would be gradually crushed down into finer pieces. Then it would be another trip back to the pile for a new supply to put down over the old red dog. The state and counties used it on the country/rural roads to help keep the dirt/mud roads more easily passable. They and the commercial companies paid the coal companies a small fee for the digging rights. The coal companies made a few bucks and they were glad to get rid of the refuse material as it wasn't worth their time/money to deal with it. The good old days.
 
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