Model Train Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I'm a complete newcomer to model trains. I was thinking of building a basic oval for around the Christmas tree, but want to invest in something that I could potentially expand upon in the future. I've done quite a bit of reading over the past few weeks but still find this world a tad overwhelming! I settled on HO scale (seems better for young kids) and have read that Kato Unitrack is great. I've searched in vain for one of the HM1 "master" sets, but can't find one short of having it shipped in from Japan. I found another set, the HV5, that seems to have everything I'd need for a basic oval except the power pack. Specially, it has feeder track which I believe is what connects to the power pack.

So, if I get the HV5, the standard Kato power pack, a locomotive and some cars, is that enough to make them go? Is there something else I'd need? From what I've been able to read I'm not confident enough that I have everything to pull the trigger on a purchase.

Of course, alternative approaches are very welcome. I'd really appreciate anyone's insight.

Thanks,
Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,523 Posts
From what I read of the HV5, it is a set of track. So yes, you will need a power pack, an engine and some rolling stock (cars).

Have you studied enough to understand DC (direct current) versus DCC (digital command control)? If you're planning on expanding to a permanent layout in the future, you might consider DCC as your operating system. It makes wiring way easier, makes for smoother operation, allows for control of sounds and lights, and allows multiple trains to run independently on the layout. Yes, it's more expensive, but is more fun.

But there is nothing wrong with going with DC. You can still have lots of fun for less money. Good luck! :smilie_daumenpos:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,095 Posts
Welcome aboard!

Hi all,

I'm a complete newcomer to model trains. I was thinking of building a basic oval for around the Christmas tree, but want to invest in something that I could potentially expand upon in the future. I've done quite a bit of reading over the past few weeks but still find this world a tad overwhelming! I settled on HO scale (seems better for young kids) and have read that Kato Unitrack is great. I've searched in vain for one of the HM1 "master" sets, but can't find one short of having it shipped in from Japan. I found another set, the HV5, that seems to have everything I'd need for a basic oval except the power pack. Specially, it has feeder track which I believe is what connects to the power pack.

So, if I get the HV5, the standard Kato power pack, a locomotive and some cars, is that enough to make them go? Is there something else I'd need? From what I've been able to read I'm not confident enough that I have everything to pull the trigger on a purchase.

Of course, alternative approaches are very welcome. I'd really appreciate anyone's insight.

Thanks,
Bill


Bill;

It looks like your basic question has been answered. You just need the oval of track, a DC power pack (any brand), a locomotive, and some cars.

As for the future, I agree with the idea of using DCC from the start. Kato, and other manufacturers, sell locomotives with DCC and sound factory installed. That's the easiest way to get into DCC. If you decide to use DCC, then you can forget buying a DC power pack, and buy a DCC controller instead.
I use, and highly recommend, the NCE Powercab DCC controller. It's simple to hook up (two wires from the controller to the track) simple to use, simple to program, (You won't even need to do any programing until you acquire a second locomotive.) The controller's electronics are all in one small hand-held unit. It also has all the features for more complex operations, should you get into that someday. You're not likely to outgrow it.

By contrast, DC would be OK for the simple loop, but when it comes to building a more permanent model railroad, DCC is better, because it can do much more, and yet requires only a fraction of the wiring that a DC layout would need. This is the rationale behind going with DCC right from the start. You said you wanted the potential to expand in the future. DCC would let you do just that.

You said you had done a lot of reading. Well, I have some more for you whenever you decide to look through it. The attached files are intended to help brand new model railroaders, like yourself, decide what kind of layout they might want, and how to get it. Much of what I've written in these files will be for that future layout, if that ever comes. For now, I suggest just skimming through any part that interests you and shelving the rest for possible future reference.

Good luck & Have fun!

Traction Fan :smilie_daumenpos:

View attachment WHERE DO I START rev 4.pdf

View attachment 1 How to build a better first layout.pdf

View attachment 2 How to build a better first layout.pdf

View attachment 3 & 4 How to build a better first layout.pdf

View attachment 5 How to build a better first layout.pdf

View attachment 6 How to build a better first layout.pdf

View attachment All AboutTurnouts rev 5.pdf

View attachment MODEL RAILROADING ON A BUDGET.pdf

View attachment Model Railroad Terminology 3.pdf
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top