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Making it match

I have a Williams ABA set in Illinois Central . I bought 8 Lionel passenger cars to go with them. The Williams were all larger . Having seen this mistake I like The Williams cars better but can't seem to find the passenger cars to go with it. Anybody know a seller of these kinds of cars.
 

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I have a Williams ABA set in Illinois Central . I bought 8 Lionel passenger cars to go with them. The Williams were all larger . Having seen this mistake I like The Williams cars better but can't seem to find the passenger cars to go with it. Anybody know a seller of these kinds of cars.

What passenger cars did you get?
I would think some Lionel heavyweights would go with them.

They sell Williams/Bachmann O scale, I never looked at any close up.
Dimensions,
navigates 0-42 curves​
single-car length 17.75", height 3.625

Take a look,
http://www.wholesaletrains.com/OProducts2.asp?Scale=O&Item=WLMSHVYWTS


I would have to pull them out and look, but I think my Lionel heavyweights are just as big if not bigger.
 

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i understand the differences between the models and brands,but what brand would be considered the closest to being true o scale?
 

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Thee isn't a single "brand" that is "true" O-scale. Each maker, Lionel, MTH, Williams, Atlas, etc. has some true 1:48 "scale" items and some "semi-scale", typically a bit smaller. You have to zero in on the actual item within a brand to know if it's really O-scale.

Note that I'm not talking about Europe here, where 1:43 is considered "true" O-scale. ;)
 

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If I remember correctly The cross ties on the O-27 were brown and on the traditional o gauge they are black. The 27 stood for the radius of the turns. The O-27 were designed to use a smaller layout a full circle is just a bit over 2 feet. My layout uses traditional 0-72 (a full circle would be 6 feet) just so I can run any engine on it. The rails were a little taller on the O-27 to make it a little harder to derail.
Herman
 

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The color of the ties is not universal. I've seen brown, black, and silver O27, and I have in my possession black and silver tie O31 track. I'm pretty sure I had some O31 that had brown ties as well.

The ties are a different shape on O31 track, they have "ears" where the O27 track ties are normally formed square.

The taller rails on O31 have no effect on the propensity to derail AFAIK.
 

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This is a great thread. Too bad I had to find out the hard way. Love those williams box cars, almost a 1/2 inch difference in hieght. Thanks
 

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Does the 'O' in O scale stand for an abbreviated word or is just the letter of the alphabet that came up next when listing scales like A,1:1 B, 1:2 ? Is the O in 027 a zero or the letter O and does it possibly mean CIRCLE = 27 inches? Probably a search term that would answer these question but I'm search impaired.
 

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Thanks John

Please share a search term or thread name to tell me what the O in O scale or HO, or other letters to designate different scales, stand for. Thanks Doug
 

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Please share a search term or thread name to tell me what the O in O scale or HO, or other letters to designate different scales, stand for. Thanks Doug
I don't think the O stands for anything.

Does this help you a little?
There are more but these are the main ones.

train_scales02.gif

Now O scale gets a little tricky, as O/27 is a bit smaller, that is explained in the beginning here in this thread.

Notice that ON30 runs on 5/8's wide, as is HO and HOn30, a different size but these run on the same tracks.


Edit,
There is an SG that stands for standard gauge it is bigger then the G. By the way G stands for garden trains.
O I don't think it stands for anything but HO stands for half of O.
 

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Technically (and historically), it was "Zero Gauge", rather than "Ohh Gauge" ...

From wiki ...

The name for O gauge and O scale is derived from "0 [zero] gauge" or "Gauge 0", because it was smaller than Gauge 1 and the other existing standards. It was created in part because manufacturers realized their best selling trains were the smaller scales.
 

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TJ's right about the O originally being a zero. As Ed states, HO was named for being roughly "Half of O scale" and G is for Garden scale since it often used outdoors. TT is for Table Top. Z scale was so-named because if was thought to be the smallest scale anyone could build a working model train, but then the even smaller T scale came along. I don't know the reason N scale was named that.

Bottom line is there's little science or consistency behind these names.
 

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Now that you said that TJ, I seem to remember servoguy stating that too when we were discussing track or switches one time.

I got to thinking about S standing for standard gauge and realized that we have S for S gauge trains.

So I changed that to SG for standard gauge. I just took a guess. :dunno:
Someone correct me if I am wrong.


I wonder what DUG thinks?
 

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Thanks Ed, John, TJ, Eljefe

I was foolishly looking for some metric system like analogy to describe the progression in gauge/scale designations.

Finding no overriding formula, I revel in the complexity. It appears to me that some names came from size variations (1 gage and zero gage) some came about as marketing schemes (Lionel radius 27 inches).

Great info, Thanks again for you help. I think I'll go loiter in the 'How to Post pictures' thread and see if I can figure out how to make a Gallery. Doug
 

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I don't think Standard Gauge ever had a number/letter designation, Ed. It used 2-1/8" track which Lionel dubbed "the Standard of the world" as a marketing ploy, to strongly suggest that any other track was somehow sub-standard or inferior.

TJ
 

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I was foolishly looking for some metric system like analogy to describe the progression in gauge/scale designations.

Finding no overriding formula, I revel in the complexity. It appears to me that some names came from size variations (1 gage and zero gage) some came about as marketing schemes (Lionel radius 27 inches).

Great info, Thanks again for you help. I think I'll go loiter in the 'How to Post pictures' thread and see if I can figure out how to make a Gallery. Doug

Dug, take note we do have a picture gallery problem that it seems no one can fix.

Read about the problem here,

http://www.modeltrainforum.com/showthread.php?t=16843
you can post in the gallery but all your pictures will only show up under one picture!
Messes up the whole thing!

Here is an example, this member has posted different pictures but see how it comes out in the gallery? They are all the same header picture but if you click on them you will see a different picture.
I wish someone could fix this, I went to clean all my pictures up so they were more organized and found this problem.
I ended up deleting all my pictures. And am still waiting for a fix to re-post them.
I would say this is a loss for the site as others stopped posting in the gallery too.
Example,
http://www.modeltrainforum.com/gallery/browseimages.php?c=3&userid=6849

I don't think Standard Gauge ever had a number/letter designation, Ed. It used 2-1/8" track which Lionel dubbed t"he Standard of the world" as a marketing ploy, to strongly suggest that any other track was somehow sub-standard or inferior.

TJ
Yep now that you said that I seem to remember reading the same quote somewhere.
"The Standard of the world"
 
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