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Draw a center line for where track will go...White-glue one side of the split cork up against the line using push pins, placing weights of any kind between the pins..When this has begun to cure run second half of cork against first half after running a bead of glue..then pin that down..You'll have to do some linear slicing of the cork for switches...
When cork is in you can pin down track onto it and, again, run white glue between ties..This will hold track, and pins can then be removed...Or, nail track right through the cork..(careful not to cause ties to bend downward).
 

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How do you hold the cork in place on curves when using glues especially liquid glues? I can see contact cement, but you have my admiration for using it. Been there on other projects. Messy stuff that requires patience and a steady hand, two attributes that I do not have.

When laying cork, I use a compass usually a stick with a hole drilled in one end for a pencil and a pivot nail in the other then draw the radius on a center line. Then lay one side of the cork against the pencil line, secure in place then butt the other side of the cork against it starting at the center point of the laid cork which alternates the joints.
Latex adhesive caulk. Lay a bead and spread it thin (not messy, as long as you know how to stop the flow of caulk from your gun). Lay one side against your centerline and curve it around. Then lay the other side. Of course, I use foam roadbed, not cork, but the principle is the same. Weight it down with something for a couple of hours. I use scrap wood and pavers. Canned food, large books, just about anything heavy. I have a friend who uses real railroad spikes.
 

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My tack driver, been passed down for generations, built three layouts with it. Big end, roadbed to plywood, small end track to cork. Haven't damaged a tie yet.

View attachment 557507
Nothing wrong with your method, as it produces good results. But I always found that laying cork and track with track nails to be fairly slow and tedious work. Of course, since I did N-scale, that could account for some of the tediousness.

Anymore I prefer clear adhesive caulk any more because I can lay cork and track lickety-split. Probably in 1/10 the time of track nails. You can lay down a whole bunch of cork first, then after 3~4 hours minimum drying time, then come back and start laying the track. The caulk gives enough time to properly position the track before it starts drying. And if you ever want to pull the track up, slide a knife blade under the ties to release it from the cork. With a bit of care, you can even pull up the cork the same way.

A lot of guys recommend the cheapest clear acrylic caulk you can find, such as DAP brand. While it does work okay, I discovered Loctite Clear Power Grab Heavy Duty Exterior Construction Adhesive. It has much better holding power than the regular DAP caulk. And it is foam-safe. Just be careful when buying construction adhesives, not all of them are foam safe.
 

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Instead of that three to four hour wait for drying you could be laying more roadbed and track.
 

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Instead of that three to four hour wait for drying you could be laying more roadbed and track.
Except for when you run out of roadbed.

And you laid down the considerable bunch you had so fast, the first of it isn't even fully dry yet. ;)
 

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Instead of that three to four hour wait for drying you could be laying more roadbed and track.
Why do you have to wait? Weight down what you've done while it's curing and keep going. I can lay roadbed and track using decent adhesive forever until my back gives out. If I had the endurance, I could lay my entire layout in one session, and it can cure while I get 8 hours of beauty rest at night. Curing time is only a limitation if you let it become one.
 

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Why do you have to wait? Weight down what you've done while it's curing and keep going. I can lay roadbed and track using decent adhesive forever until my back gives out. If I had the endurance, I could lay my entire layout in one session, and it can cure while I get 8 hours of beauty rest at night. Curing time is only a limitation if you let it become one.
Bingo. You answered other folk's dilemmas. ;)
 

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