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I've built two Atlas HO layouts so far, but have moved to N becuase space is at a premium. I found a great plan I modified in the MR 101 Track Plans book. The only issue is that I cannot figure out where to make the cuts in the plywood (cookie cutter) or how to best build the underlying frame that should support the plywood that the track will lay on. The plan has elevation information, but I can't figure out a good way to make it work.

I have used the Atlas Plans in the past...Granite Gorge and The Central midland- both included the framing plans, so they were rather simple to make.

I had thought about using the foam insulation blocks, but am not sure how I would attach the track (nails?) or how I would mount an under-the table switch in that configuration.

Any thoughts you may have are much appreciated.

The name of the plan is #58, The Grand River Western.

Thanks

Tom
 

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Mine is cardboard (Stop laughing) with 1"x1" bracing. I don't think that this stuff is even made today. It is from the 1950's. I will post some pics this weekend. The table top is just sitting on the legs. It is simple set up that I allows the lay out to be stored on its side against a wall. I have most of the switches under the table. There are some still on the top. Two of them have not been moved because of the 1x1 bracing. The others are in the yard and I can work them from the Engineers seat.
 

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"Cookie Cutter" layouts are layouts made in sections or modules. Each section of the layout is built as a module or "cookie". Modules, or "cookies", are then fitted together to form the completed layout.

Great concept if one changes eras or is a member of a club that participates in shows. You can take a module/cookie to the show and add it to others to make a layout.

My layout is done this way. I can change from my usual 1920-1960 theme to modern times, 1980-present, by changing 4-6 modules. That can be done in less than an hour. The modules I change out contain watering and coaling facilities and a couple of more modern factories and warehouse facilities. I also add a modern intermodal section which is actually an "add" rather than a "change".

Bob
 

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ok so you make different interlocking sections, are the tracks set up so they line up perfectly for joining them together. if so how difficult is that to do?

sounds like something good for my apartment then to make bigger to play with my nephew elsewhere.
 

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ok so you make different interlocking sections, are the tracks set up so they line up perfectly for joining them together. if so how difficult is that to do?

sounds like something good for my apartment then to make bigger to play with my nephew elsewhere.
I used NMRA Standards. Many clubs use them, makes for simple reconfiguring of the layout. And should you decide to join a club, you can use your module(s).

There is a post on here somewhere that give you the standards. Or you can google NMRA Standards for their site.

Bob
 
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