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Seeing as I'm asking about paints today, I'd love to have some guidance about the subject color. I think it's made out of unobtanium. I do have a rattle can pf 'wimbledon white', which ain't white, but impresses me as tending toward the holy grail tonight, 'cream'. If someone knows of a commercially available cream, I'd love to hear about it. Another of my rattle cans is 'racing white' which also ain't white and tends toward creaminess, too.

One of my problems is that I have no idea at all how to mix some other colors into white to get cream. That, too, wouldn't be bad to know.

Again, thanks to all for helping me out.
 

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I'm sure, if you Google "vallejo cream paint", you'll find something close to what you want.
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Funny you'd bring this up. I just received a bottle of this:
Testors Cream 1/4 oz

Haven't had a chance to try it out yet so I don't know if it's a gloss or flat finish. Otherwise, you can make your own by mixing brown with white.
 

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One company's "Dirty White" is another company's "Ivory". You really have to decide what color (actual color, not name) you want and match it by eye. There is no uniform standard to matching of color names across companies.

Mixing is also an art form. Start with a base color and gradually add other colors until you get what you want. For what I would call cream, take a white base and add light brown and yellow. Use a pipette to get uniform drops, and write down your formula so you can reproduce it later. Note the EXACT color you use (Vallejo "White" or Model Master "Flat White", because as noted above, the shades won't necessarily be the same).
 

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Discussion Starter #5
One company's "Dirty White" is another company's "Ivory". You really have to decide what color (actual color, not name) you want and match it by eye. There is no uniform standard to matching of color names across companies.

Mixing is also an art form. Start with a base color and gradually add other colors until you get what you want. For what I would call cream, take a white base and add light brown and yellow. Use a pipette to get uniform drops, and write down your formula so you can reproduce it later. Note the EXACT color you use (Vallejo "White" or Model Master "Flat White", because as noted above, the shades won't necessarily be the same).
Thanks for speaking up. Your advice matches what I was guessing. I couldn't intuit how I'd keep my blend of white+brown 'warm' without the addition of something else, yellow, as you suggested. No yellow means my mixture would head toward some kind of dirty white, but not the tone we think is 'cream'. I realize that it's all a crapshoot when we try to blend proprietary colors that are already blends of who-knows-what. My first stop willb be to prepare some test panels using the primer I use, and see what 'Wimbledon White' and 'Racing White' look like on a surface. And proceed from there.

Thanks again.
 

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Otherwise, you can make your own by mixing brown with white.
Note that when making light colors you want to use very little of the darker color. When I painted a small shack I was going for an off-white color, something like an eggshell white. My first attempts were terribly over-saturated because a single drop of brown was too much. What I ended up doing was dipping the tip of a toothpick in the brown, and stirring that into my base white, which gave me a lot more control over how much tinting was added.
 

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Mixing paints to get the color you want can be interesting.
But, to get the hang of it, go to the crafts paint department
at Walmart, Michaels or other such store. You'll find vials
of many, many colors, all water based and at very little cost.
Get a selection of basic colors. It is available in flat and
enamel. Use a small cup for mixing, (I used large
plastic bottle caps) and, as suggested, start with the base
color, then add one drop at a time of one or more a colors, stir with
a tooth pick or similar as you add each color.
Try different combinations until you get what you want.
For most model applications you won't need much paint.

Don
 

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Note that when making light colors you want to use very little of the darker color. When I painted a small shack I was going for an off-white color, something like an eggshell white. My first attempts were terribly over-saturated because a single drop of brown was too much. What I ended up doing was dipping the tip of a toothpick in the brown, and stirring that into my base white, which gave me a lot more control over how much tinting was added.
Yes. Or you have to start with quite a bit of the base color. I have roughly 150 different shades of Vallejo's Model Color / Panzer Aces (PA has many of earthy tones we use for model railroading), so I'm generally not doing much adding to white these days; typically I'm tweaking a color in the middle of the range, so that's a good reminder.
 
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