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Discussion Starter #1
I recently found a layout design that was created in Z scale. What would be the easiest way to convert the thing?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
As far as the track goes I know that HO has 18, 15, and 22 degree curved. what are they in reference to N gauge?
 

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As far as the track goes I know that HO has 18, 15, and 22 degree curved. what are they in reference to N gauge?
these are no degrees, those are radiuses. and R18- R15 are to tight if you ask me.

otherwise just convert R22 times 87 (as in 1:87) devided by CORRECTION 148 (as in 1:148) = ~12.7
so R22 in HO roughly equal R12.7 in N. not sure what section s they make for N but why use those? use flexi instead :)
 

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Yard Master & Research
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The radius is to scale and therefore the same ( not the exact same measurement though). Go with flex track and don't worry about buying the right curves. a 15 inch radius is probably 7.5 in Z. But Z I think is all metric.
 

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using flex is something I have considered and most likely use. I was thinking that using curved track would save a lot of head aches but it may just do the opposite. thanks for the suggestions.
 

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tankist is the math equation that a person uses like the one you gave about radius listed any were else???
 

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tankist is the math equation that a person uses like the one you gave about radius listed any were else???
ehhh, there is no equation really, just a very simple math :) don't mean to insult you but in which grade do they teach multiplication and division ? first or is it second?

it might be listed somewhere of course but i don't think it really needs to be as this is something you just remember. as T man said, it is roughly half. bit more precise it is 0.58
 

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G0 to circle math. A=Pi R squared or R= sqrt of A/Pi. Pi =3.141592 A is the area of a circle. R is the radius of the circle. With that formula, Area is proportional to Radius. The larger the circle the larger the radius.
 

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G0 to circle math. A=Pi R squared or R= sqrt of A/Pi. Pi =3.141592 A is the area of a circle. R is the radius of the circle. With that formula, Area is proportional to Radius. The larger the circle the larger the radius.
awesome!!!

now lets try that
you will need pen, paper and built in microsoft calculator in scentific mode

Problem1:

"pair of 9 inch long rails intersect each other at 12.5 degree angle in their middle point. the crossing is later upgraded to form an ideal double slip switch (diverging path starts at the very ends of lines).
a. calculate the radius of a curve train will be negotiating while taking the diverging path.
b. calculate radius if the slip switch is not ideal - diverging path points located 2" from rail ends."

problem 2:

"user BNSF_affictionado32 just joined the www.bestMRR_forum_out_there.com . user wants to build a shelf layout with shelves 24 inches deep. user wants maximum possible curve radius in the corner where two shelves meet for his 8 axle loco. negelecting the width of the rail, calculate the maximum radius posible withot the rail hanging of the benchwork"

lets hear them :D
 

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Problem one needs a Diagram. I think you are confusing the radius of a circle to angles and triangles. Radius is length, degrees are angles.
Second problem your link does not work. He could just use a pencil on a piece of string and draw different arcs by varing the length of the string. Measure the string on the arc you use to get the radius.
 

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diagram is part of the solution and all the info is there.
you know the length of the lines, you know they intersect in the middle of eachother, you know the angle in degrees they intersect at. find the radius of a circle that is tangent to marked endpoints.

as far as the link i highly doubt such website exists, lol. can be modified to "user X just joined forum Y ..."

diagrams for both attached
 

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Yard Master & Research
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Question 2 use a 4 foot string. To make the corner you need to drop two feet providing you are against the back shelf. You have to start your turn two feet back any mor and the curve won't fit on the opposite side. So your drop is two feet your run is two feet. Your radian is one. You travel about 4 feet to get around the corner hence a 4 foot radius.
Radian is distance traveled (circle arc)over Radius.
Circumference is 2 Pi Radius.


Question one I always thought everything was straight not curved. So I disagree on your drawing. The double switch is a set of parallel lines connected by an X
 

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string was not in allowed instruments list (you allowed pencil, sheet of paper and scientific calculator). string will only allow to aproximate, the problem asks to caculate :)

Question one I always thought everything was straight not curved. So I disagree on your drawing. The double switch is a set of parallel lines connected by an X
double crossover is indeed two parralell lines. however i asked about double slip switch.











i guess noone is interested.
 
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