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Hey all,

This may sound stupid, but what is the difference between "S" scale and "Standard" scale?

I see both listed on eBay, but I'm not sure what the difference is.

I thought they were both the same:confused:

Cheers, Ian
 

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Railroad Tycoon
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Hey all,

This may sound stupid, but what is the difference between "S" scale and "Standard" scale?

I see both listed on eBay, but I'm not sure what the difference is.

I thought they were both the same:confused:

Cheers, Ian
Standard scale is nearly twice as big, well maybe not twice as big but it is a lot bigger.
 

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Left to Right - Lionel's Standard Gauge, Large Scale, O Scale, and HO scale models.


4trains.jpg


S is in between O and HO.
 

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Imatt,

I realize I'm late in replying, but thought I'd add a little. As Ed pointed out, it's a different size, but it's also a different history and, to some extent, philosophy. I cite wikipedia on S Gauge:

"Strictly speaking, scale is the relation of the size of a model to that of its prototype, and gauge is simply the distance between the railheads.

However, within the modeling community the terms "Scale" and "Gauge" seem to have taken on very specific connotations. In many cases, the original "toy" trains were built of plated & lithographed tin and/or thick printed cardstock, making use of oversized wheels & couplings and running on track sections that were designed more for ease of use and robust service rather than pure fidelity of reproduction. Small or delicate details were often represented as simple graphics on the models or even omitted altogether. This style of modeling enjoys a large and enthusiastic following to this day, with a brisk trade in both vintage and contemporary models. Many annual public events are held to promote and proudly display fine examples of the genre. These "tinplate" works and displays are most often (rightly or wrongly) associated with the term "S Gauge", perhaps because many of the early firms marketed their wares using this specific phrase."



S scale, in the United States, was the result of a strategic decision on the part of A.C. Gilbert, as in American Flyer and Erector Set. A.C. wanted a competitive advantage in his race with Lionel. He decided to go for Lionel's weak point: accuracy. Lionel started with the gauge and made cars to fit it; the biggest criticism is that they aren't proportional to real trains. American Flyer started with the real train, scaled it down accurately, and then said, "Now...what track size do we need to make to fit this train?"
So, S gauge is track-based, while S scale is scale-based.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Reck,

Thats a lot of good info. Thanks.

I've also noticed, since I really started paying attention to American Flyer, that their trains actually look like trains. At least the steam engines, anyway.

I've also noticed that they are actually equal to, if not more expensive than comparable Lionel trains.:eek:

I like my Lionel stuff, but I would have no problem switching completely over to S scale if I ever had to;)

Luckily, right now, I have enough space (barely:rolleyes:) to run both O and S:D.

So no worries:thumbsup:

Cheers, Ian
 

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I like my Lionel stuff, but I would have no problem switching completely over to S scale if I ever had to;)

oohhh whhhosssh oooohh whhosssh ... "Luke, I am your father ..." oooh whhooohsss oooohhh whooossshh ...

(Temptations of the Dark Side)

TJ
 

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*sits back and sloooooowly cranks the reel after gently setting the hook...*
 
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