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Discussion Starter #1
Hello. On the picture below you can see different configurations of rail yards. All configurations, except first one, provides sidings of almost the same lengths.

 

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And your question, (or point) is...?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Maybe somebody wants to build yard with sidings of the same lengths.
 

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Oh, ok.
Sorry, I didn't mean to sound sarcastic or rude.
 

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Andrey

All of the yard designs in your post are double ended. That's very good if you
have benchwork that large. It provides access to each track from both
directions and is very useful for 'making up' trains and for
staging yards. The double ladders, tho, take up a lot of real estate.

For many modelers space limitations dictate stub ended
yard tracks. Any of your designs could also be used as
a 'stub' end yard.

Either way, yards, along with several industrial spurs, on a layout
will provide hours of interesting and challenging switching
operations.

Don
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hello. Yes, I understand, that double ended yards requires space. I posted this picture like "how to" information, because not all people know this schemes, and maybe this information will be useful for them.
 

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Andrey

Yes, what you have posted will be of value. Hardly a week goes by that doesn't
have questions from new guys wanting help in designing their layout. Seeing
your drawings will be a good deal of help to them. Apologies if you thought I
was critizing...I try not to do that...my post was intended to add to your ideas.
Keep 'em coming.

Don
 

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I appreciate your post, Andrey. It's very good information, even if it doesn't, or can't, apply to so many of us with limited room for a yard. I am just about to build a yard on my 2.8 m X 5.8 m around-the-wall layout, and I don't have a firm plan in mind. However, I know full well that it will have to be stub-ended ladders with only 2.5 meters of yard length to work with. But, your post urges me to consider other possibilities, maybe even a hybrid of some kind where the one or two ladders closest to the main can be double-ended.

I figure a person with an HO scale layout who wants a double-ended yard of any real utility and approximate realism is going to need over 3 meters of length for maybe three ladder tracks. Four and more ladders will add almost another full meter, and it goes up from there. Otherwise I would have a sizeable layout with trains fitting on 1.7 m ladder tracks, or a passenger locomotive with five trailing heavyweights and nothing else...no head end cars.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Don
Thank you for kind words. Yes, I usually don't ask questions on forums, I only like to post "how to" information. Unfortunately, I don't have much space. I only posted it for those guys who are more lucky than me.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
many of us with limited room for a yard. I am just about to build a yard on my 2.8 m X 5.8 m around-the-wall layout
Hello, Mesenteria.
I have a solution which may help you to build more ladders in the same space. The solution is turnouts with high guardrails (guardrails which are higher than the top of the rails). High guardrails are very effective in preventing derailments on the frog, so they will allow you to use curved turnouts with small radius, and to use #4 turnouts instead of #6. So you will save pretty much space. On this video you can see turnouts with high guardrails in action:


Straight turnouts on this video are #4. If you decide to try this, feel free to ask questions. I will do what I can to help you.
Also, high guardrails is a prototypical feature. This is short video, where you can see real turnouts with high guardrails:

 

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Pretty sure we covered everything about high guard rails in your last thread. They don't help build turnouts in smaller spaces -- either your loco can take a #4 turnout or it can't. They might be added as a safety feature or help on high-speed mainlines, but a high guard rail isn't going to magically make your locomotive bend around too tight of a curve.

Back to the subject here, really most of the yard designs pictured above (except for the last one) have dissimilar lengths, they just disguise it in different ways. And that's not a bad thing, because in most prototype yards you will see the same thing. It really comes down to how much space you have available and how well you use it. For example, in my layout design I was limited on space but wanted a working double-ended yard. I found the first style above fit perfectly inside a large curve in the layout, with the decreasing-length sidings being closer to the curve. I may not be able to string up a bunch of 50-car trains but now I have the space to prep one or two, plus the shorter sidings can be used to stash extra cars until they're needed.
 

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Andrey, I appreciate your kind offer. However, I have wide curves on my layout and enjoy being able to couple my tenders to my locomotives as closely as possible, which looks more prototypical. If I go with even 4.5 curves, I won't be able to do this. I'll have to attach the tenders to all my steamers at the hole in the drawbar furthest away from the locomotive.
 
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