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Discussion Starter #1
I always thought this was a great idea, until I moved to a state that had one. NY has a 5 cent deposit on soda, beer and water bottles and cans.

The problem with it was that the return centers at the grocery stores were usually crowded, and many times the machines were either full or not working.

They use a system called Deposit Link, which is supposed to accept all brands that were purchased in-state. The reality of that was much different.

You could always go to the customer service desk at the store if the machine wouldn’t take it, and stand in that line.

A lot of those containers wind up being tossed in the trash or directly recycled. What happens to that deposit money?

After dealing with it for 10 years, I came to the conclusion that it’s not worth it. Just put recycling bins in. Forget the 5 cents. (Or 10 in some states). Glad I don’t need to mess with it anymore.
 

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I don’t know if PA ever had a law, but when I was a kid, you would get 2 cents for each beer bottle or Soda/Pop bottle that you returned. The bottles would be sterilized and reused. Sometimes when you bought a case of soda or beer, it would be obvious from the wear on some of the bottles that they had been used many times. Then they started using non-returnable bottles.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I don’t know if PA ever had a law, but when I was a kid, you would get 2 cents for each beer bottle or Soda/Pop bottle that you returned. The bottles would be sterilized and reused. Sometimes when you bought a case of soda or beer, it would be obvious from the wear on some of the bottles that they had been used many times. Then they started using non-returnable bottles.
Yes, that was my main source of income when I was a kid. We would scour the construction sites for glass bottles and return them for the deposit. Heavy glass and yes, re-used many times.
 

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It's $.10 here and yes here lines of people with shopping carts full. I give them to my son since he doesn't have a job he can stand in line with the minions.
 

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No bottle law in Wyoming. And it shows in many roadside ditches. But that's also a result of people's refusal to recycle. It's not like it's a chore to recycle. There's just this prevailing attitude of "throw it away...wherever."
 

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My province (Alberta) has deposits on bottles, soda cans, beer cans and bottles, juice boxes and plastic milk jugs. We have a bottle depot system here, and it works pretty well. A lot of people donate their empties to charities, Boy Scouts, hockey teams, etc.

Or, if we are too lazy to go to the bottle depot, we can throw them in our city's blue re-cycle bins, and the city will get the refunds....

And there are no cans and bottles laying around anywhere, as the deposit encourages people to take them back to the depot.....motivated people will pick them....

Throwing them in the trash is such a waste.....
 

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Surprisingly, Washington State does not have a bottle deposit law, although there have been multiple attempts to impose one by voter initiative. So far, the successful "against" argument (from the grocery retailers and the beverage industry) has been that the handling and disposal of the returned empties would add "overhead" costs that would be passed on in higher prices. :rolleyes:
 

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In CT here, too.

When I go for my afternoon/evening walk, I take a plastic bag.
If I find one can or bottle, I'm happy.
Two or three, that's even better!
I save 'em in paper bags on the back porch.
When I have enough, I take them to the market and get some money.

Being retired, it's my only "extra income" ;)

Having said that, it's ridiculous about getting rid of plastic bags in supermarkets here.
What are places like Walmart going to do?
 

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It's been remarked here in Wyoming that the plastic shopping bag is the state flag...you see them flying in trees, bushes, fields, etc. We have a recycling program where I live, but among the things they DON'T take is plastic bags! I just don't get it. :confused:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
It's been remarked here in Wyoming that the plastic shopping bag is the state flag...you see them flying in trees, bushes, fields, etc. We have a recycling program where I live, but among the things they DON'T take is plastic bags! I just don't get it. <img src="http://www.modeltrainforum.com/images/smilies/confused.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Confused" class="inlineimg" />
Most grocery and big box stores usually have a bag recycling box near the front door. They don’t have that in WY?
 

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British Columbia has recycling depots where people are required to take their empties, plastic, old paints, poisons, hard drives, appliances, metal, drywall, etc. It works surprisingly well, although illegal dumping can be a problem due to the fees at the landfills where much of the stuff can also be...'deposited'.
 

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The state does not have a paper bag law but my county does. The supermarkets, Target and Walmart all pack items in large paper bags but many people are switching to their own tote bags. I was in San Diego last year and they charged 10 cents for a plastic bag and most people there brought their own bags.
 

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In CT here, too.

When I go for my afternoon/evening walk, I take a plastic bag.
If I find one can or bottle, I'm happy.
Two or three, that's even better!
I save 'em in paper bags on the back porch.
When I have enough, I take them to the market and get some money.

Being retired, it's my only "extra income" ;)

Having said that, it's ridiculous about getting rid of plastic bags in supermarkets here.
What are places like Walmart going to do?
We actually benefit from Connecticut's deposit law. Our Boy Scout troop has a trailer at the local transfer station to collect returnable bottles and cans. 4-5 times a year, we get the whole troop (and parents) together on a Saturday morning and sort it. Of course, we have to deal with a fair bit of trash and other recycling mixed in, but it's worth it. After the recycling company takes their cut, we usually net about $650 for a morning's work. That just about covers our operating costs for the year; we do very little other fundraising.

In CT, at least, the state turns the unclaimed deposit money over to the General Fund of the state budget.

As far as the plastic bag ban, I think you have your facts wrong. Beginning next week, stores will be required to charge customers $0.10 for each plastic bag they use. The full ban doesn't go into effect until July 1, 2021.

Since I regularly complain about the number of plastic bags I get, that's fine with me. We've been using reusable shopping bags almost exclusively for many years, now. It's really not a big deal. Just store them in the trunk of your car, and you always have them handy.
 

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Do you people that use the re-usable bags clean them and disinfect them after each use. I have read stories about people getting bacteria infections because they didn't clean the bags.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Do you people that use the re-usable bags clean them and disinfect them after each use. I have read stories about people getting bacteria infections because they didn't clean the bags.
Can’t see why that would be necessary. Never heard of that. Been using those bags for years with no problems. Sounds like urban myth.
 

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Can’t see why that would be necessary. Never heard of that. Been using those bags for years with no problems. Sounds like urban myth.
If you put meat/poultry that are in Styrofoam plastic wrapped containers where sometimes the juice can run out if left in the bag will form mold and bacteria.
 
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