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I have been searching for info on these locomotives, in answer to one question…..why was the angle of the rounded noses of these locomotives changed, from the steep angled slant nose of the E6 (and earlier E units) to the less slanted E7 (and E8’s and 9’s)…..

There must have been a reason to change it….unless it was merely a design change for the sake of it…..

Was there a “reason”? I kind of like the more slanted noses….

E6 and earlier
View attachment 571319

E7 and later
View attachment 571320
 

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And in the UK...

Ohhh that looks so sleek and fast! Honey, let's go to Pitlochry for supper.

Love those LMS Coronation class Pacifics!
However, back to the E unit noses: One very practical reason for reducing the slope is that it permitted putting a nose door on the units. This would allow passage of crew into a passenger train, thus allowing a change of crews on the go. There was a passage on both ends of B units, but, if an A unit with the nose facing the rear of the train was added to the power consist, there would be no way to get from the loco to the first passenger car.
As another poster mentioned, a more vertical slope would could possibly permit better servicing access. Having a door in the nose would certainly make access to the nose area for servicing whatever was in the nose even easier!
 

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One thing I immediately noticed at the NCTM at Spencer is the EMD ACL #500 restored there is the headlight is a trumpet shape, not the cylinder shape of most models. As a metalsmith, I can attest that a compound curve is the most difficulty to create by hand both to get smooth and symmetrical as well as make as mirror image shapes. The earlier slant noses were one giant compound curve likely hammered out in halves and joined. Finding highly skilled "tin benders" would have been much more difficult after the 40's when almost all auto body panels were stamped in machines rather than hand formed. The bulldog nose only has the much more simplified compound curve top piece that could be easily stamped out or even hand hammered into or over a form by a less skilled metal worker. The lower section of the bulldog was just rolled flat sheet metal.
 
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