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No, and I'm thinking you wouldn't. The end of train device came about largely because the rear of the train was no longer occupied by a brightly painted, manned car.

Doesn't mean you couldn't do it on your own layout if you wanted to, though.
 

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Speaking of cabooses, what was the job title of the guys that rode in the caboose?

Did they make that much salary that the railroads were losing a lot of money by having a crewed caboose?

I miss them.
 

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There were lights on cabooses, referred to as Markers. This has led to the phrase "bringing up the markers" to describe the last car on a train.

I don't think there was a dedicated person just to be in the caboose. A caboose was for carrying a crew to inspect a consist at stops, and help with switching out cars.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caboose
 

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Yes RRs still use conductors & sometimes brakemen if there's any switching to do. These days they ride in the lead engine. Also these days a caboose will be used for long shoves. Worked one train to Irvine CA om the San Diego Sub. Then we shoved up to almost Atwood to do more switching on the Olive Sub. So these days they are know as just "shoving platforms. In fact some are nothing more than flat cars with "handle bars" to hang on to!
 

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So it wasn't the cost of the crew then.

Does it cost that much in weight or maintenance to maintain a caboose?
 

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Train crew

Speaking of cabooses, what was the job title of the guys that rode in the caboose?

Did they make that much salary that the railroads were losing a lot of money by having a crewed caboose?

I miss them.

MichaelE;

A traditional, steam era, full train crew was made up of five men. The engineer ran the locomotive, the fireman was responsible for maintaining steam pressure in the boiler by adding fuel or water, as needed. There were two brakemen, a head end brakeman, and a rear brakeman. The former often rode in the locomotive cab, the latter in the caboose, with the boss of the train, the conductor. Before air brakes were adopted, the two brakemen had the very dangerous job of hurrying along the running boards fastened to the tops of the cars, and setting the hand brakes to stop the train. They also aligned switches, and acted as flagmen when the train made an unplanned stop possibly due to a breakdown.

Fast forward to today. No steam locomotive, no need for a fireman. Reliable automatic air brakes, and dynamic brakes, no need for brakemen. So a contemporary train crew has only an engineer, and a conductor. Both ride in the locomotive cab. Train crews are union employees and are paid hourly wages rather than salary. They cost plenty, and the savings made by going to a two member crew multiplied by the large number of trains, added up to millions of dollars saved by the railroads.
Having a caboose tacked on to the end of a train also required extra switching and therefore time and money. Buying, and maintaining a fleet of cabooses was also hugely expensive. In the end, it just didn't make economic sense to keep using cabooses.
However, on model railroads, we still can! ;)

Have fun;

Traction Fan:smilie_daumenpos:
 

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Doubtful a railway would hook up a caboose just to give it a ride.....just sayin'.....
One of the things that a FRED can be used for, is to blow the air brakes from the rear of the train in an emergency, something that would have also been possible from the caboose.

One of the railroads I worked on, had an industry, where a three mile shove had to be performed nightly.

The last move before leaving the yard, was to pickup the caboose, with FRED on the rear of the caboose, since the caboose would be unoccupied. The conductor would then walk the brake test to the front of the train, and board the locomotive.

At the switch for the industry, the conductor would get off the locomotive, and when the train cleared the switch, line the switch for the shove, and board the caboose to watch the rear of the train for the shove. Once this industry was switched, the caboose was along just for the ride.

Why not just leave the caboose on the track? Vandalism!!!
 
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