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The FL9; you sure picked a one of a kind loco. Living and working in New York I saw many of these in NH, PC, Conrail and Metro North schemes. I left New York before the colorful schemes you posted but I remember seeing an FL 9 in McGuinnes paint with the NH painted out but a small PC mating worms painted in the middle stripe. I believe after they became Conrail blue they had their noses painted yellow for when they became Metro North commuter units but I'm not sure when the yellow nose paint began.
At some point, CT DOT repainted them in a pure McGinnis scheme again, as they did with many other locos they had (even new P42's). That has changed to a new scheme, which is nice looking, but as a preservationist, I prefer the older one.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
My two favorites, one I work on for a living, the other I admire from a distance.

1873 Mason 0-6-4T "Torch Lake", the last surviving example of a Mason bogie design which was a pretty early articulated style locomotive. The pivot point is directly above the center drive axle and the swivel casting also contains the flexible joint for the dry pipe carrying steam to the cylinders. It's somewhat of a mechanic's nightmare to work on in some aspects, but is a great locomotive to run and fire (at least in cooler weather).

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A bit more modern, but I've always enjoyed the styling and mechanical design of the N&W J class locomotives. I got to work as a car host during 611's first weekend of public excursions when returned to service in 2015 which was a great experience. My O scale model from Lionel spends most of its time in a display case since I enjoy looking at it somewhat like a piece of artwork.

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Beauties! 611 is, IMO, one of the most incredible surviving North American steamers. That experience as a car host sounds like a lot of fun馃憤
 

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Diesel: Fairbanks-Morse H-16-44. Not all that much different than others of the era, but there's something. LHF of course.

The prime mover is the FM 38 8-1/8 opposed piston diesel. Variants of the 38 8-1/8 and other Fairbanks-Morse engines provided (and continue to provide) backup power on US nuclear submarines commissioned through the 1990s. Currently marine Opposed-Piston applications include use as main propulsion engines and service generators. The USCG Hamilton-class cutters use the 38 8-1/8 engine in a CODOG arrangement, where the diesel engine provides cruise propulsion, and a gas-turbine provides propulsion where high speeds are required.

The Fairbanks Morse Opposed Piston engine is also used as a stationary power generator, both in primary and standby duties. The Whidbey Island class and the Harpers Ferry class, currently in service, use four as their primary source of electrical generation.




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At some point, CT DOT repainted them in a pure McGinnis scheme again, as they did with many other locos they had (even new P42's). That has changed to a new scheme, which is nice looking, but as a preservationist, I prefer the older one.
In looking at some photos I saw that the FL9 and EP5 had different versions of the McGuinness scheme. The color bands, top to bottom, were white, black and orange on the 9 and orange, black, white on the 5. I had not noticed that before.
 

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In looking at some photos I saw that the FL9 and EP5 had different versions of the McGuinness scheme. The color bands, top to bottom, were white, black and orange on the 9 and orange, black, white on the 5. I had not noticed that before.
Each different loco had it's own scheme, fitting within the general pattern of alternating, angular patches of white, black, and red-orange. I still prefer green and gold, but you have to admit the McGinnis scheme is flashy.
 

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I just can't be too specific, I have too many favorites.
In general any B & O steam loco. They just looked nice and they were usually clean.
With Diesels I liked the appearance of the Baldwin sharks and the newest GEs.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
I have many favorites, but based on the sheer number of models that I have purchased it would have to be the American 4-4-0's. There are many more stuffed away in bureau drawers.
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Good pick馃憤 You can't get much more classic than those 4-4-0's.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
A few more of my favourites:
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Pennsylvania E7 4-4-2
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This 4-6-2 resides in my hometown, and is now kept as a static exhibit in a semi enclosed shed.
 
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