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Discussion Starter #1
Hi again everyone,

I tried my first weathering this afternoon (I hope you can tell the difference :) I used the drybrush method with a rust colour (brown and bright red mixed together)

I would love some feedback - what did I do well? what can be improved?

This was my attempt at rust. What other colours are popular to show dirt, grime, age ...

Thanks! (In addition to being colour-blind I have absolutely no sense of colour :( )

547203
547204
 

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Not bad, but overdone on the herald.
Try vertical streaking instead of overall blotching...
"Weather", especially rain, doesn't generally broadside things as much as 'drips' messy stuff on it in vertical patterns.
Blacks and dark greens can simulate mold and very old rust.
Dark reds will sim newer rust. Try to stay away from orange for rust, because it tends to look phony on a model scale.
Grays and off-whites can sim dust on horizontals (roofs, etc).
 

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BTW, dry-brushing is the method I prefer nowadays, so IMO you're on the right track.
 

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Probably a better approach would have been to fade the whole paint job using a light mist of white or light gray paint, applied with an airbrush. If you don't have an airbrush, it's probably a good investment. In the meantime, try using a wash -- very very thin paint.

After that, SELECTIVELY apply rust. Rust will generally appear along seams, and in places where damage to the paint occurs. In addition to the rusted spot itself, rust generally will create streaks on the car, beginning at the rusted spot and gradually fading as they run down. This is easily done by drybrushing -- start your stroke at the rust spot, and pull straight towards the bottom o the car. The roof, rivets, areas around the door, and the lower 1/4 of the car will tend to have the most rust.
 

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Looks a tad too sooty as if it's all engine exhaust, as opposed to weathered from sun, rain, whipping winds, snow and ice..
 

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In addition to the above, I would also add that I think your 'dry' brush is still holding too much paint. Drybrushing should barely add any paint to the surface, it's more for adding highlights.

As a suggestion for the steps you might want to take, I would start with a wash of very diluted white paint to cover the whole model and give it a faded look. For rust streaks, use a (not quite so) diluted paint and let the tip of the brush drip near the top of the car and run down the sides. You'll get some rust along the seams, but also from the low spots along the roof, and under the door ledge, and it will be more in spots rather than an all-over coating. The trucks will see a nearly complete coverage of rust and grease. Finally, dust and dirt will be kicked up from the wheels along the lower edge of the car. This is where dry-brushing can be applied, and should give a dusty appearance. Dirt can be anything from earth colors to tan or red clay to medium grays.

The really great weathering jobs are done by layering different effects. Paint a coat, let it dry completely before starting another coat. The overlapping of the effects provide more realism and I've even seen some rust jobs where they may have several different layers of 'rust' on a single spot.
 

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And that was a good car to practise on, since the CP Rail paint scheme for red boxcars is totally wrong.....lettering is supposed to be white, and the PAC Man multi mark colours are opposite of what it’s supposed to be.....

But the weathering is not bad for a first attempt......
 

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I have used a combination of oil paints as well as acrylic paints. The main colors I use are burnt sienna and burnt umber. What I do is add a spot I want to look like it’s really rusted (burnt umber acrylic) and let that dry. Then I’ll apply a LITTLE bit of burnt sienna oil paint on the very edge of that burnt umber spot and I’ll dab some paint thinner on it to make it naturally flow out.(this is for top of car) as for the sides I’ll first start with a wash to full down the car body and then I’ll go and add small specs of burnt umber oil paint to where I want the rust spots then I’ll dip my brush in paint thinner and pull it down vertically. This method has worked out well for me anyway
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks everyone.

Luckily I have a small collection of garishly-painted CP rolling stock to practice on!
 

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Drybrush 'streaking' goes a long way in producing a realistic look.
kadee_nyc004.jpg
NH_40510_002.jpg
 
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